Bullet identification, please


#1


Going thru grandpa’s box again. I need help identifying bullets pictured. I found a brass mold marked Tranter without other markings, pictured, and poured some lead. The cal seems to be .45 or close. Is this a typical bullet profile??The base seems weird. Is that one big grease groove? What type of firearm might this have been used in?
Thanks


#2

Tranter was an English gunmaker who produced all sorts of rifles, shotguns, and handguns; it’s possible these bullets were meant to be used in tied-style paper-cartidges.


#3

Not a clue. Just wanted to say, NEAT FIND! The other one, too. Any idea how long your Grandfather had them? Was he a shooter or collector?


#4

Thats a conical bullet mold for a Tranter cap and ball revolver.

Google “Tranter revolver” and you will get a picture up eventually.

The mold is out of a boxed set most likely. The deep groove is for tying off the top of the paper cartridges.

Tranter was at the top end of the cap and ball revolver price range. The mold will be worth money to a collector. If you can make a firm Civil War connection that goes double/treble.


#5

My grandfather was a hunter/farmer/who grew up in Indiana, moved to Wisconsin and hunted as a young man as far as Lousiana and Texas in the late 1890’s. He was not a collector but rather a user of the products of his day. He was friends with the Indians in the area he farmed and would often take me to an inlet on a lake where we would find flint arrowheads. He also taught me how to bend ash to lash to stone axe heads which I still have. Great memories. His primary firearm was 1894 Rem .32spec(1904), octagon barrel, which I still use for deer. I found the molds and some civil war era cartridges(.54 Burnside, etc) in one of his “junk” boxes along with what I now find to be a Buffington sight. Never saw him with pistols or revolvers or a Trapdoor rifle which would account for the sight. He did load his own shotshells and I have a supply of 12ga drawn brass cases ,a primer extractor, and cartridges I am still working on identifying. Ultimately all for sale to a collector as there is minimal interest from family members.


#6

I researched Tranter revolver as suggested and noted one was made in .44 caliber. That leads me to believe the bullet in question is a .44, not .45.

The deep groove at the base still intrigues me. Is there a .44 cartridge out there somewhere in the ether that I could view so I can see how the bullet sits in the cartridge??


#7

The glossary from the home page has a few drawings that sort of resemble what these paper cartridges would have looked like when loaded, but they don’t show the string that would’ve tied the paper tube to the base of the bullet; if you imagine the below with a couple of loops of string around the bullet, crimping the case into the thick groove, that’s about as close as you’re going to get (at least quickly).


#8

[quote=“herky”]I researched Tranter revolver as suggested and noted one was made in .44 caliber. That leads me to believe the bullet in question is a .44, not .45.

The deep groove at the base still intrigues me. Is there a .44 cartridge out there somewhere in the ether that I could view so I can see how the bullet sits in the cartridge??[/quote]

I think tranter revolvers were described as 54 bore but dont get too hung up on the actual calibre because they were nominal to say the least. The bullets or balls were oversize to ensure they were a tight fit in the chamber and a small ring of lead would be shaved off the bullet as it was being rammed home.