Bullets and cars


#1

I just read this Yahoo story autos.yahoo.com/blogs/motoramic/ … 13371.html
which states that GM fires live ammo at their cars, I assume, as a safety/QC/QA procedure. “All we’ll add is that while GM says it didn’t design the Volt to be a “political punching bag” and might not be the first choice for a hunting trip, it did shoot battery packs to ensure they wouldn’t blow up if bullets passed through.” I was not aware of any weapons/ammo testing directed at civilian market. Is it common? What kind of ammo do they use?


#2

I guess it might be because cars get shot up every day in Detroit.


#3

Your question brought back memories of those videos that were popular in the 80s of people shooting all sorts of calibres at, among other things, plenty of cars. A sort of early day Mythbusters. Not so much about what bullets would do, more about what they wouldn’t do.

My abiding memory of those videos was a 7.62 and a 5.56 not penetrating a car windshield because of slope on it. I can’t see an electric car is going to be much at risk from urban small arms.
The bigger environmental risk from those batteries is going to be the high speed wreck on the highway type of situation. Getting T boned by a truck on an intersection would surely split the batteries open. And thats much more likely to happen, inevetable even

This is just marketing spin So safe it withstood a bullet from a gun. While steering the conversation well away from issues about battery cars they would rather not discuss. Like how do you dispose of the batteries at the end of a cars life? Or what is the life expectancy of the car if a cellphone battery only lasts on average three years?

The bullets thing is just a marketing red herring.


#4

Some years ago a Musselshell County Deputy Sheriff gave me a Federal Super Slug for my collection. It is a 10 gauge 3 1/2" mag. He said they use it to shoot out the engine block of get-a-way cars. They tried it out on several old junk vehicles and he said it worked great.

DennisF

P.S. Musselshell County has never had a get-a-way car. Horse theif, maybe, but never a car.


#5

[quote=“DennisF”]Some years ago a Musselshell County Deputy Sheriff gave me a Federal Super Slug for my collection. It is a 10 gauge 3 1/2" mag. He said they use it to shoot out the engine block of get-a-way cars. They tried it out on several old junk vehicles and he said it worked great.
DennisF
P.S. Musselshell County has never had a get-a-way car. Horse theif, maybe, but never a car.[/quote]Makes you wonder where the engine block sits on a horse…
Anyway, more likely to happen is the ‘bricking’ of the car as has been reported lately happening to a Tesla roadster in California, as with mobile phones it goes completely dead if the battery is fully drained.
I don’t collect shotgun shells, but do have a 10 gauge (I think) slug used for cement kiln cleaning.
Soren


#6

When I was growing up the police chief told me about a .375 H&H that the Quebec Provincial police had mounted in a car .

There was two German brothers robbing banks at that time.
They had shot out the motor of one police car with a .300 Weatherby round.

Glenn


#7

The cast iron V8 blocks on older cars were solid in the extreme. More likely to target the radiator, even so it would take many miles to bring the car to a halt. Into the next County I would say in most instances.


#8

I never believed that any typical non-explosive round could do anything to an engine block other than maybe punch a hole in it.

As most will be aware of, there has been a lot in the news about Chevy Volt batteries catching fire after a collision. I imagine shooting batteries somehow is intended to establish that they won’t catch fire. Don’t get me started about the technical problems associated with battery-operated vehicles, aside from the undisputed fact that all that electricity necessary to power them does not magically appear, and it must be generated, mostly from burning fossil fuels.