Cal .30 Stripper Clips (again)


#1

Peter (and others)

Speaking of Cal .30 stripper clips (another nearby thread), prior to WW 2, the Dummy cartridges were assembled in special clips made specifically for them. What do they look like and where can I get one?

Ray


#2

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Peter (and others)

Speaking of Cal .30 stripper clips (another nearby thread), prior to WW 2, the Dummy cartridges were assembled in special clips made specifically for them. What do they look like and where can I get one?

Ray[/quote]

Hello Ray,

Years ago I bought a grey steel charger of five Dummies, steel cased, FA 4 headstamp in Washington. These were as new at the time and I believe that it was the correct charger. The spring had no end tabs to retain the rims of the outside rims and, when looked at under magnification, the metal was smooth so the tabs were not broken off.

The body of the charger was exactly the same as the normal steel ones for ball rounds, just the spring lacked the tabs as they would have broken off anyway.

gravelbelly


#3

Dave

What little I have read (very little) seemed to imply that the spring was heavier in the dummy clip, allowing for a better grip on the cases. Maybe because of the missing tabs?? Later, it was determined that the standard spring tension was sufficient and so it, without tabs, was accepted for use.

Your description seems to fit that narrative.

Thanks

Ray


#4

As usual when it comes to cartridge clips there is very little information available, in the case of US Cal .30 ones we’re fortunate to have the Brophy book which has a section on accessories … including the clips for the '03 rifle. What’s there is a good start and a lot better than nothing but it invites more questions than it really answers.

Back in the days when e-bay was a bit more relaxed about allowing cartridges and shooting stuff I bought a clip full of dummies from a seller in the US, the cartridges were marked ‘FA’ and were from 1907, the sort with 6 flutes and three holes in the flutes. Unfortunately the necks were so badly split and the tinned finish so worn I didn’t pay much attention to the cartridges but the clip was one of the early ones for use with dummies.

It has quite a thick phosphor-bronze spring with the ends of the spring slightly bent back towards the body which makes inserting cartridges quite easy as you don’t have to push the end of the spring down with the base of the cartridge as you’d normally have to with a standard clip.

This is the later version, just a standard clip made without the end tabs,

… and this is the one made from phosphated steel once brass became scarce.

As an interesting aside, there are a number of British Ordnance Board minutes where the propensity for the Cal .30 clip to shed it’s little tabs, rendering it unsuitable for further use, is discussed at some length. There were even drawings produced in order to facilitate production of replacement springs here in the UK to solve the problem … although the purchase of a large number of new springs from the US was also mentioned. Here is the drawing for the earlier type of spring.

Who’d a thought the clips could be so interesting !!

Peter

Edited once. Shoddy proof-reading


#5

Wow Peter, thanks for all that great information. As you said, who’d a thought a clip could be so interesting.

As it often happens, my questions usually result in a lot of work for me. I have quite a few of the clips that I’ve accumulated over the years. Many of them have no tabs. Now, I’ll have to go through them, checking to see if the tabs are simply broken off from use, or missing them on purpose.

And, it’s probably wise to not even get started on the Garand clips.

Ray