Carrier No. 22 Mk 1 - for Bangalore Torpedoes


#1

I have this steel carrier for four projectiles. It is marked CARRIER No 22 MK 1 SV360A ECL 1962. The dummy “things” in it are made of steel with wooden ogive. The bases are plastic with an internal screw thread.

What is this thing?

gravelbelly


#2

[quote=“gravelbelly”]I have this steel carrier for four projectiles. It is marked CARRIER No 22 MK 1 SV360A ECL 1962. The dummy “things” in it are made of steel with wooden ogive. The bases are plastic with an internal screw thread.

What is this thing?

gravelbelly[/quote]

One suggestion that I was given some years ago was that the “projectiles” were supposed to screw into the ends of Bangalore Torpedoes, anyone else able to hazard a guess?

gravelbelly


#3

Everything I looked at on M1A1 Bangalore, both early and later models, showed a slip-on nose cap. Admittedly, all US variations. This pic out of AMERICAN ARSENAL had the best depiction of components.

Which leads me to guess that gravelbelly’s items are for some other purpose. I’m gonna keep lookin’. Wish I had a set.[/img]


#4

Got a guess on the “caliber”?


#5

They are the "anti-snag heads " of a Bangalore Torpedo…at least I think they are ;-)

There’s a pic of the head here:

http://www.millsgrenades.co.uk/Soe%202.htm

I’ve removed the word INERT as I don’t know 100% that they are and it’s better to be on the safe side.


#6

Unless misidentified by the picture taker, I’d say we have a winner!

Great site, too.


#7

[quote=“slick rick”]Unless misidentified by the picture taker, I’d say we have a winner!

Great site, too.[/quote]

I agree, the ident looks good to me. However this set looks like a typical piece of military over-engineering. The carrier is of heavy gauge steel and weighs 1.76 Kilograms (3 pounds 14 ounces) empty. Each anti-snag head/tip weighs 516 grammes (1 pound 2 ounces). So the total weight of a full carrier would be 3.82 Kilos (8 pounds 6 ounces) about the weight of a rifle. If I had been asked for the best way to carry these gadgets in the field I would have suggested a webbing sachel or bandolier, not a heavy steel box. The steel sleeve around each of the anti-snag heads can rotate a few degrees between definite set limits. I don’t see how this thing works.

Anyway, this thing does not fit into my collecting interests so I shall trade it on A.S.A.P. Thanks for the replies folks.

gravelbelly


#8

Just found this little blurb on topic:

The device the Indian sappers developed comprised of a long narrow tube, 2.5 inches in diameter and 6.5 feet long, with a wooden pointed head at one end, and at the other a wooden firing handle with fuse and a safety pin. Both the head and firing handle could be readily removed and additional 6.5 foot sections could be added to make the required length of explosive charge. The tube containing the explosive was made of light tin sheeting so that any splinters that did survive the explosion could not travel far and endanger the bomber. The approximate 12 pounds of explosive charge in the 6.5 feet tubes could be made up of dynamite sticks or gun cotton slabs. The loading of the tubes with the explosive charges could be done in the field. Also, as mentioned earlier, several 6.5 inch tubes could be joined together by means of sockets to make up the required length i.e. 13 feet, 19.5 feet, 26 feet, etc. To this tube, at one end, was attached the head - 8 inches long - and, at the other end, the 13 inches long firing handle, complete with the fuze and safety pin. No wiring between the tubes was required; the explosion of the first tube was activated by the firing device, and this explosion automatically set off all the other sections in series.

Contrary to what we usually see in motion pictures, the Bangalore Torpedo was not thrust under the base of the coiled barbed wire - in this event half the force would be absorbed by the ground - but rather threaded through the centre of the coiled barbed wire. In this way all the explosive force would be concentrated on the whole mass of the barbed wire barrier. The wooden head of the torpedo was pointed to facilitate its threading through the coils of barbed wire.


#9

And just in case anyone was REALLY interested in these, here’s a good link:
angelfire.com/biz7/troopgear/00984.doc


#10

The carrier No22 you show is the post war carrier for 4 x 6ft sections of Bangalore Torpedo plus one inert bullet head as shown. (stored sideways at one end)

I’m starting to learn more about Bangalore Torpedo’s than a man should :-)


#11

[quote=“Armourer”]The carrier No22 you show is the post war carrier for 4 x 6ft sections of Bangalore Torpedo plus one inert bullet head as shown. (stored sideways at one end)

I’m starting to learn more about Bangalore Torpedo’s than a man should :-)[/quote]

Armourer,

Now that makes more sense. With one of these carriers clamped onto each end of a set of tubes two men can carry the load. I see no means of attaching an Anti-Snag head onto my carrier though. Perhaps there were two variants of the carriers, one with a stowage for the head. I wonder how rare these carriers are, it is the first that I have seen, but there was not much call for Bangalore Torpedoes in the Royal Navy.

gravelbelly


#12

[quote=“Armourer”]The carrier No22 you show is the post war carrier for 4 x 6ft sections of Bangalore Torpedo plus one inert bullet head as shown. (stored sideways at one end)

I’m starting to learn more about Bangalore Torpedo’s than a man should :-)[/quote]

Hello armourer,

Are you going to the ECRA Bisley meeting on Saturday? If so I will bring the carrier for you to see.

gravelbelly