Cartridge boards in St. Petersburg museum


#1

I just came across these images and thought some of you may appreciate it as much as I do.

fotki.yandex.ru/next/users/oleg … leg-bebnev

fotki.yandex.ru/next/users/oleg … leg-bebnev

fotki.yandex.ru/next/users/oleg … leg-bebnev


#2

Alex, great find!!! This appears to be St.Petersburg Artillery Museum saint-petersburg.com/museums … ry-museum/. Here is more of the inside, wish I were there…
fotki.yandex.ru/users/oleg-bebn … 79174?&p=4


#3

EOD - Oleg has other nice photos in that same photo album… Even a rocket truck! Lol! VERY neat!

Thank You for sharing!


#4

RimPin, yes there are more than 4000 images. I checked them all.


#5

EOD:

I HAVE ALWAYS ADMIRED CARTRIDGE BOARDS. OF THE 3 YOU SHOW, I LIKE NUMBER 1 THE BEST. THIS IS ONE OF THE FINEST BOARDS I’VE EVER SEEN. IT IS REALLY AMAZING THAT THESE BOARDS HAVE SURVIVED 2 WORLD WARS IS SUCH WONDERFUL CONDITION. THANK YOU FOR POSTING THESE.


#6

EOD - unfortunately, I can’t open these pictures. I get a message “Done, with errors.”

Are any of the three from after WWII?


#7

John, all 3 boards are pre 1945 and I actually pre 1918 as far I can say.
It is 2x 7.62x54R M1891/M1908 and 1x 7.62x39R M1895.


#8

Alex, thanks a lot for sharing these photos.

Like GWB in my view the first board is the most interesting, comparing the old round nose and the new spitzer cartridge data.


#9

The alphabet used in all three cartridge boards is the pre-revolutionary version including letters now obsolete. Jack


#10

I think the 1st photo has the following written under metal penetration sample, Санкт Петербург Военный Патронный Завод = Saint Petersburg Military Cartridge Factory. The metal penetration plate states that both rounds are fired at 25 metres. I thought they used “arshin” at that time. Arshin was abandoned in 1924. Maybe this plate was added after 1924?


#11

I think that the use of 25 meters is a convention in metric-country ballistic testing, just as velocities are (or at least once were) tested at 78 feet in U.S. practice. Jack


#12

They used the Boulenge chronograph invented in Belgium. With it came tables to translate the drop of the measuring rod into time of flight. These were usually calibrated for a flight distance of 50 m, resulting in the velocity at 25 m. It is a bit like American ballisticians originally using a G table with the velocity entries in meters per second (because it came from France).

Note that the spitzer cartridge is marked as spitzer (as far as I can tell), not as 1908g or even L. In my view the first board is very likely to originate from a time shortly before the adoption of the 1908 bullet.


#13

Alex, these boards are great, thanks for sharing.