Cartridge boards in St. Petersburg museum

I just came across these images and thought some of you may appreciate it as much as I do.

fotki.yandex.ru/next/users/oleg … leg-bebnev

fotki.yandex.ru/next/users/oleg … leg-bebnev

fotki.yandex.ru/next/users/oleg … leg-bebnev

Alex, great find!!! This appears to be St.Petersburg Artillery Museum saint-petersburg.com/museums … ry-museum/. Here is more of the inside, wish I were there…
fotki.yandex.ru/users/oleg-bebn … 79174?&p=4

EOD - Oleg has other nice photos in that same photo album… Even a rocket truck! Lol! VERY neat!

Thank You for sharing!

RimPin, yes there are more than 4000 images. I checked them all.

EOD:

I HAVE ALWAYS ADMIRED CARTRIDGE BOARDS. OF THE 3 YOU SHOW, I LIKE NUMBER 1 THE BEST. THIS IS ONE OF THE FINEST BOARDS I’VE EVER SEEN. IT IS REALLY AMAZING THAT THESE BOARDS HAVE SURVIVED 2 WORLD WARS IS SUCH WONDERFUL CONDITION. THANK YOU FOR POSTING THESE.

EOD - unfortunately, I can’t open these pictures. I get a message “Done, with errors.”

Are any of the three from after WWII?

John, all 3 boards are pre 1945 and I actually pre 1918 as far I can say.
It is 2x 7.62x54R M1891/M1908 and 1x 7.62x39R M1895.

Alex, thanks a lot for sharing these photos.

Like GWB in my view the first board is the most interesting, comparing the old round nose and the new spitzer cartridge data.

The alphabet used in all three cartridge boards is the pre-revolutionary version including letters now obsolete. Jack

I think the 1st photo has the following written under metal penetration sample, Санкт Петербург Военный Патронный Завод = Saint Petersburg Military Cartridge Factory. The metal penetration plate states that both rounds are fired at 25 metres. I thought they used “arshin” at that time. Arshin was abandoned in 1924. Maybe this plate was added after 1924?

I think that the use of 25 meters is a convention in metric-country ballistic testing, just as velocities are (or at least once were) tested at 78 feet in U.S. practice. Jack

They used the Boulenge chronograph invented in Belgium. With it came tables to translate the drop of the measuring rod into time of flight. These were usually calibrated for a flight distance of 50 m, resulting in the velocity at 25 m. It is a bit like American ballisticians originally using a G table with the velocity entries in meters per second (because it came from France).

Note that the spitzer cartridge is marked as spitzer (as far as I can tell), not as 1908g or even L. In my view the first board is very likely to originate from a time shortly before the adoption of the 1908 bullet.

Alex, these boards are great, thanks for sharing.