Cartridge from 1936 Concord, New Hampshire Army Maneuvers


#1

Here’s an interesting item that was included in a mixed box of cartridges, old gun parts, bullet molds, loading tools, and trash that I picked up at the local gun show last weekend. There doesn’t appear to be anything unusual about the cartridge or the links, but obviously someone thought it was special enough hung onto it all these years.


#2

Strange from an “Army” maneouvres: Steel linked ammo was not used by the (Ground) Army till late in WWII, and then Korea; and before that only in Armoured vehicles. ( so possibly from some of the “Renault” or “Chaffee design” Light tanks fitted with M1919A2 or A5 Guns.

What is the headstamp of the cartridges? ( is it M1906 or M1 ammo)?

SAR has extensive articles on metal Link development, with separate articles dedicated to Browning and other links thru their History.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics


#3

The headstamp is FA 32.


#4

Notice how the empty link is upside down? I wonder if the links are even original to the cartridges…since they look “put-together” by someone who apparently did not understand how the links are supposed to be oriented…

Odd color for the links too. Are they phopshated or zinc plated? any markings on the links?

AKMS


#5

Assuming the links are actually correct for the time, I would imagine they were put together with the cartridge by someone who lived in Concord at the time. I doubt a soldier would have had much interest in a memento.

The links have no markings, but are definately plated steel.


#6

[quote=“DocAV”]Strange from an “Army” maneouvres: Steel linked ammo was not used by the (Ground) Army till late in WWII, and then Korea; and before that only in Armoured vehicles. ( so possibly from some of the “Renault” or “Chaffee design” Light tanks fitted with M1919A2 or A5 Guns.

What is the headstamp of the cartridges? ( is it M1906 or M1 ammo)?

SAR has extensive articles on metal Link development, with separate articles dedicated to Browning and other links thru their History.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics[/quote]

Hello DocAv,

I must be having one of my “dumb” moments (getting more frequent) because I am staring at your final sentence and it is not ringing any bells. So I will be the one to ask the dumb question, what is SAR?

gravelbelly


#7

I see I also had a oldtimers moment - the title of this thread should refer to the 1936 maneuvers, not 1932, although it is not likely to make much difference.


#8

SAR = Small Arms Review?

Regards
TonyE


#9

Here’s a snippet of information that came up in a Google search on ‘Concord, New Hampshire, 1936, Army’:

From China Marine to Jap POW: My 1,364 Day Journey Through Hell - Google Books Result by William Howard Chittenden - 1995 - History - 199 pages
1936. the Group conducted winter test maneuvers at Concord, New Hampshire. The purpose of these maneuvers was to test the B-10B on the ground and in the …

I know this is a long shot, but could the links have come from the guns in a Martin B-10B?


#10

Here’s an article from the February 10th, 1936 Time Magazine - looks like the purpose of the maneuvers was to test aircraft machine gun operation in freezing conditions:

Flying Flagship
What dolls are to little girls, war games are to little armies. Last week the little U. S. army of the air


#11

SAR of Henderson nevada, Monthly magazine dedicated to MGs, Silencers,DD (Dangerous devices—Grenade Launchers etc) and occasinally other SA .
Successor to “Machine Gun News.” Both edited by Dan Shea of Long Mountain Outfitters.( formerly of Maine, now of Nevada.)

Has indepth articles by US, British, French etc Authors on wide ranges of topics, one “thread” being MG links and Feed strips by a French Author.
Another series covered all the Maxim, Vickers and DWM belts for both National and export models.

Both Modern and “Antique” MGs are dealt with, as is memorabilia (“MG companies” of WW I); some quite rare and strange Guns are described.
It is also a Guide to the US and World Arms Industry, with a US based MG dealers perspective of special NFA legislation and Administrative practice.
(NFA== National Firearms Act, 1934, now subsumed into Gun Control Act 1968 et seq) which Act did put a Tax on Machine Guns and certain other articles (“Transfer Tax”) and caused their Registration (under the Tax Power of the Constitution, which otherwise would have prohibited Registration as a purely “Gun Control” matter.)

The SAR is a very good source for items related to ammuniton, both SAA and larger than 12,7mm.
Find them on the Web (www.sar.com)

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#12

Now that we have a plausible reason for the cartridges and links being in New Hampshire in 1936, can anyone shed light on the plating on the links? I’ve never seen or heard of such, but that doesn’t mean a whole lot. JG


#13

Browning links made during the 20’s and 30’s were tinned as standard finish.


#14

TB: Thanks for the reply; that’s a question answered and something else to be on the lookout for. JG