Cartridge Rarity?


#1

I need help to determine the rarity and value of this cartridge. Cal .30 M1906, National Conduit & Cable Co., 1918. If someone could tell me how many were made and how many were shot up, it would help. Otherwise, what else can you tell me?

Thanks

Ray


#2

It can


#3

These seem to be a bit harder to find than other WW1 vintage ammo.

I believe that Hackley Woodin & Scranton Vol 1 has produciton totals.

Sometimes these are encountered in two piece cardboard boxes of 20 with limited markings (perhaps lot number or date only).


#4

Phil

I plugged .40/1989 into my inflation calculator and that cartridge is now worth 69 CENTS !

Ray


#5

Interesting! Are the blanks and the ball rounds, about the same value?
Thanks!
sam


#6

Is it just my old eyes, or is that ‘N’ in the headstamp crooked??


#7

Incidently, Ray, I’ll be happy to give you $0.70 for it.


#8

I’ll beat Gut’s Offer X 3 an pay half the postage, but only cause of the tales i could tell by living in N.C.


#9

You guys are too generous. Now it looks like I started a bidding war. In the interest of world peace I’d better destroy it.

Guy, that “N” does seem to be crooked, depending on how you look at it. When I took the photo first time it looked really bad so I took another with the sun at a different angle. Probably just an optical illusion. Unless it’s the rare Crooked N headstamp variation. Chris didn’t cover that one in his book.

Ray


#10

Ray, don’t think there are carloads of the N C rounds around. If you read Hatcher and Whelen they said the cases were so badly made they popped a few low number Springfields with case ruptures and the military recalled the stuff. Always the shooter that “liberates” a few rounds from any military match I shot in. My dad started 30 caliber shooting in 1925 and never saw any on the range but had heard the stories of the cases being bad.

Gourd