Case Capacity 5.8x42, Bullet Length/Dimensions


#1

Does anyone have a 5.8x42mm case capacity measurement, or a case that they could measure?

I need the case capacity up to the mouth.

Also, if anyone has the length of the DBP-10 bullet, or even better, a set of drawings of that bullet, that would be much aprpeciated, as well.


#2

Is the DBP-10 the standard FMJ bullet? Mine is 17.68 mm long

I have several 5.8 mm cases but I have no way to measure their capacity


#3

I have goggled the 5.8 x 42 and found that the DBP-10 has been adopted in 2010. The bullets I have should be the DBP-95, that are slightly different


#4

17.68mm long? That doesn’t sound right at all. That would make them less than 3 calibers…

DBP-95 is show sectioned in the case at left, here. It appears to be around 4 calibers long.

I am specifically looking for dimensions of the DBP-10 bullet, but even the DBP-95 would be appreciated.

Do you have a scale? If so, to measure case capacity, all you have to do is plug the primer pocket of the case, fill it with water until the meniscus is showing, and then dump the water out onto a container on a scale. The weight of the water gives you the volume of the case. In the US, case volume is simply measured as grains water, and that will suffice. To convert to cubic centimeters, divide by 15.43.


#5

Tau,

I don’t know, since I have seen this caliber for the first time only two days ago. I have bought a toy made with cases and dummy rounds

Anyway, since you are saying that the DBP95 is longer, I suspect that who made the toy used 5.8 mm pistol bullets instead of the rifle ones to “reload” the dummies


#6

Capacities for 3 cases headstamped 61 10 are 32.5, 32.6 and 32.7 gr water (equivalent to 2.11, 2.11 and 2.12ml)

NATO Dave


#7

So much easier, less messy, and more accurate, to simply weigh the empty case, fill it with water, weigh the full case, and then subtract one from the other.

Ray


#8

Even easier is to tare the balance after placing the case on the scale pan - no maths required :>)
Just remember to dry out the steel cases afterwards.

NATO Dave


#9

Thanks!

Yeah, either of those methods for weighing cases are a bit less involved. It was late, and I was tired.