CCI headstamp on 38 Special


#1

This is an aluminium case made by Omark Industries, CCI-Speer / Sporting Equipment Division, Lewiston ID 83501 USA

  • Does N R means Not Reloadable?
  • What does mean +P after caliber .38 SPL?


#2

You are correct that N R = Non Reloadable.

+P is what ammo manufacturers use to denote that the cartridge generates higher than standard pressures and velocity.


#3

[quote=“LeonGeisler”]You are correct that N R = Non Reloadable.

+P is what ammo manufacturers use to denote that the cartridge generates higher than standard pressures and velocity.[/quote]

Thank you very much


#4

Also sometimes +PP as well. Although often with +P the true ballistic difference was negligable, maybe 35fps more than standard.

I have always regarded the term as more of a marketing tool than a ballistic reality. Very effective as a marketing aid, people really swallowed the bait. I’m sure John can tell some stories from his shop.


#5

[quote=“VinceGreen”]Also sometimes +PP as well. Although often with +P the true ballistic difference was negligable, maybe 35fps more than standard.

I have always regarded the term as more of a marketing tool than a ballistic reality. Very effective as a marketing aid, people really swallowed the bait. I’m sure John can tell some stories from his shop.[/quote]

Thank you!


#6

Did you mean +P+? I’ve not heard of +PP…

AKMS


#7

While it was not really a marketing tool, but a result of lots of factories pushing the envelope on SAAMI Standards that the +P and +P+ designations came about, Vince is right that whether intentional or not, it was a good marketing tool for them. Even target shooters wanted +P ammo (not serious ones - I am talking about just the average guy who owns a couple of handguns and goes to range a few times a year, but is not into self-defense in a big way, nor hunting - until we talked them out of it explaining it just made shooting that much more difficult and put more wear on their guns and their pocketbooks.

The +P factor, like Vince says, can be negligible or serious. Basically, if it is over SAAMI standards, no matter how little or how much, it was +P. Then, because it covered such a wide gap, they developed the +P+ level. In .38 Special, for example, those rounds can near .357 Magnum pressures and velocities. They were for Police Agencies who were so politically correct they did not want to use “Magnum” ammunition in their guns because the leftist news agencies would get on them for using too powerful ammunition to shoot the bad guys that were trying to kill them. Very similar to the Hype over “AP” pistol ammunition owned by the public, but in reverse (meaning here it was the cops getting criticized).

The +P started out, as I recall, just with .38 Special, at a time when most major police agencies in the United States still used revolvers. Now, most all of them use auto pistols, probably why we have seen the proliferation of the +P designation on headstamps of 9 mm, .40, and .45 (and even on one loading of Hungarian Makarov ammo).


#8

[quote=“JohnMoss”]While it was not really a marketing tool, but a result of lots of factories pushing the envelope on SAAMI Standards that the +P and +P+ designations came about, Vince is right that whether intentional or not, it was a good marketing tool for them. Even target shooters wanted +P ammo (not serious ones - I am talking about just the average guy who owns a couple of handguns and goes to range a few times a year, but is not into self-defense in a big way, nor hunting - until we talked them out of it explaining it just made shooting that much more difficult and put more wear on their guns and their pocketbooks.

The +P factor, like Vince says, can be negligible or serious. Basically, if it is over SAAMI standards, no matter how little or how much, it was +P. Then, because it covered such a wide gap, they developed the +P+ level. In .38 Special, for example, those rounds can near .357 Magnum pressures and velocities. They were for Police Agencies who were so politically correct they did not want to use “Magnum” ammunition in their guns because the leftist news agencies would get on them for using too powerful ammunition to shoot the bad guys that were trying to kill them. Very similar to the Hype over “AP” pistol ammunition owned by the public, but in reverse (meaning here it was the cops getting criticized).

The +P started out, as I recall, just with .38 Special, at a time when most major police agencies in the United States still used revolvers. Now, most all of them use auto pistols, probably why we have seen the proliferation of the +P designation on headstamps of 9 mm, .40, and .45 (and even on one loading of Hungarian Makarov ammo).[/quote]

Thank you, John! Interesting and complete answer


#9

[quote=“AKMS”]Did you mean +P+? I’ve not heard of +PP…

AKMS[/quote]
Yes sorry, finger trouble