Chargers (stripper clips) for the Remington 8 and 81 SLR's


#1

These are clips for the Remington 8 and 81 self loading rifles. I have had help in identifying them from Bob Taylor and Peter Mackinven, thanks to both of you. The markings on the clips refer to the calibre .25, .30. .32 and .35 Remington cartridges introduced for the Model 8 in 1906. The rifle design was improved to produce the model 81 in about 1936, when .300 Savage was added to the range, and discontinued around 1951. The clip for .35 Rem/.300 Savage has a wider stop than the one for the 25-30-32 calibres. This is because the latter clip is shorter end to end (the cartridges are of smaller head diameter), thus the 35 clip has to have a wider stop to prevent it from entering too far into the receiver, which is identical for all calibers. This variation is true for all the variants of these clips.



The brass clips are standard production up to about 1940; the slots in the ends are so the sides can be nipped slightly inwards to provide extra grip to the cartridges. The flat steel clip is late Remington production, probably post-1940 and a similar one was made for the larger calibres and will be marked for 300 and 35 calibre but I don


#2

Thanks gravelbelly,

Not only have I learned there were civilian clips, but also a new word: ARTIFICER-3. an enlisted man responsible for the upkeep of small arms and machine guns etc. [syn: armorer]

Rick


#3

While I have a passing knowledge of these rifles, I had no idea that they used chargers! I wonder if these were intended for civilian use or were part of an effort to sell these rifles to military organizations. I too would like to see if commercial ammunition was packed on chargers. Very interesting subject. Thanks for sharing!

As for the term “Artificer”, In the 1944 dated U.S. Army basic training handbook that belonged to my wife’s late uncle, they use the term
"Armorer-Artificer". This was the first and only time I have seen the use of the word artificer. It must have died out after WWII?

AKMS


#4

From what I have read, ammo was not sold loaded on these clips. 2 of these clips came as accessories with each rifle sold. A collector in Oregon owns one of these rifles in the original wooden shipping crate with all the accessories. In the crate was a little envelope containing the two brass clips. The cartridges can be loaded into the rifle one at a time without the help of the stripper clips.


#5

[quote=“AKMS”]While I have a passing knowledge of these rifles, I had no idea that they used chargers! I wonder if these were intended for civilian use or were part of an effort to sell these rifles to military organizations. I too would like to see if commercial ammunition was packed on chargers. Very interesting subject. Thanks for sharing!

As for the term “Artificer”, In the 1944 dated U.S. Army basic training handbook that belonged to my wife’s late uncle, they use the term
"Armorer-Artificer". This was the first and only time I have seen the use of the word artificer. It must have died out after WWII?

AKMS[/quote]

AKMS,

I doubt the military connection as these are all in pure sporting calibres. Lots of sporting rifles and pistols used to have chargers, certainly in the UK. Kynoch marketed 6.5 Mannlicher-Schoenauer, soft nosed, on the typical Pieper chargers and .30 Mauser, also soft nose, on ten round clips. DM sold the 8x56mm Mannlicher soft nose on five round chargers. In more modern times special Garand clips were made, restricted to about three rounds capacity. This is presumably for civilian use in those countries/states where an eight round magazine is unlawful. I saw one of these special Garand clips last year in a Dutch collection but don’t have one yet. I have many clips and chargers if people are interested in seeing them.

As for the honourable profession of “Artificer”, they were certainly around in the Royal Navy up to and probably beyond 1980. There were various trades: Engine Room Artificer (the Black Gang), Shipwright Artificer (Chippy), Electrical Artificer (Greenie), Aircraft Artificer (Airy-Fairy), Ordnance Artificer (Gun-buster) etc. They all had to serve, and qualify, a 5-year apprenticeship and the minimum length of service was 12 years from the age of 18 plus any time required to attain that age. Whilst Ordnance Artificers were responsible for the good order and serviceability of small arms their scope extended through all calibres of guns, missiled, depth charges, hydraulic aircraft catapults and bomb lifts etc. They also maintained and operated the control systems for all weapons. It was fun.

gravelbelly


#6

[quote=“Hardrada55”]From what I have read, ammo was not sold loaded on these clips. 2 of these clips came as accessories with each rifle sold. A collector in Oregon owns one of these rifles in the original wooden shipping crate with all the accessories. In the crate was a little envelope containing the two brass clips. The cartridges can be loaded into the rifle one at a time without the help of the stripper clips.

[/quote]

Hardrada55,

Thanks for posting the photo of the filled clip and the catalogue page. Are those .35 Cal cartridges? Unfortunately I couldn’t enlarge the catalogue page enough to read it but it is an interesting bit of additional info nevertheless.

gravelbelly


#7

The ammunition for the Remington Auto-Loading series was never sold with the clips. I have checked all the UMC and Remington-UMC catalogs from 1906 to 1942 and all list ONLY the 20 round cardboard box. Some of the Military calibers such as 6mm Lee-Navy, 7mm Mauser, 8mm Mannlicher, etc. are listed as available either with or without clips, but not the Remington series.


#8

Those are .35 Remington cartridges. The FN 9mm for Browning “carabine semi-automatique” was essentially the same cartridge. I have a 9mm FN somewhere. Some of the very earliest Remington Model 8 rifles do not have the stripper clip guides milled into the top of the receiver. All the rifles after the first couple of hundred rifles made do have the stripper clip guides milled into the receiver.

I’m sorry I couldn’t post a picture which enlarged. I couldn’t get any better view of the advertisement myself.


#9

Does anyone have any details about the extended magazines offered for the Remington Model 8? You could buy, as an accessory, an extension for 10, 15, or 20 rounds from a company called Peace Officer’s Supply or something like that. I wonder when exactly those were introduced, what they weighed, and what they cost at the time. Thanks!

Cheers

HANS


#10

What I have read somewhere is…Peace Officer Equipment Company sold all kinds of supplies to Police Departments, Sheriff’s Offices and Jails all over the United States. If you bought enough cleaning powders and night sticks from them over time, your local law enforcement organization would eventually qualify to receive a Police Rifle as a premium for being a good customer of the Peace Office Equipment Company. I think you could also send them guns to be modified with the 15 round detachable magazine. I have seen pictures of both Model 8 Remingtons and Model 81s modified in this fashion, so I think the time period for the Peace Officer Equipment modified rifles was from the late 20s to the late 30s. I remember seeing an auction several years ago with a Remington Police rifle with a very short 5 round magazine. I have never seen a 10 round or 20 round magazine. There was a gunsmith in Michigan in the 50s named Kreiger (??) who would modify your 5 round nondetachable magazine on a Model 81 into a detachable 5 round magazine for a fee. These are sometimes mistaken for Police rifles.

Frank Hamer (rt) and Ted Hinton (lft) at the site of the ambush of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow


#11

In checking the 1911 Alfa catalog I find that FN’s version of the Remington Model 8 was offered with two clips. Probably the FN ammo was available only in unclipped boxes. As far as I know the FN was made only in .35 caliber. JG