Cleaning barrel fouling from Cupronickel


#1

Years ago CN was very much in use as bullet jacket cladding, but snipers and target shooters must have had the same problems with fouling as we have today with tombac. Tombac can be removed fairly easy with an ammonia solution, but what was used with CN?
I have looked the Net through, but found nothing.
Soren


#2

Hoppes #9 was developed to remove CN fouling.


#3

There were in the U.S. very strong ammonia solutions popularly known as “ammonia dope” that could be used for nickel fouling, but improper use would result in the solution attacking the barrel steel. Search “ammonia dope” on the web and hits will be found, including one at cruffler.com. Various abrasive pastes were also employed to mechanically remove CN fouling (and some of the barrel, too, if you overdid it). Jack


#4

In Britain there was a preparation called Motty Paste, made by Parker Hale which was a form of coarse jewellers rouge. Smear some on a patch and work away but its tedious. Jewellers rouge will work because it won’t remove the steel only the nickel - eventually.
In my time .303 rifle shooters would forgo the joys of CN bullets rather than put themselves through the effort.

What I would advise is that you fire off an email to the makers of Shooters Choice (Venco Industries Inc in Ohio) and ask their technical people if they market anything or have any recommendations.

Forrest Bore Cleaner (Theoben Ltd) claims to remove nickel but its a British product and I don’t know how available it is elsewhere. If you can’t get it locally try Reloading Solutions in Oxfordshire England, they would probably send you some. FBC is highly regarded for copper fouling over here, probably the top choice among serious target shooters. Or I will be going to Bisley in a couple of weeks, I can get you some then.


#5

Shooter’s Choice sells a product called “Copper Remover” It works quite well for metal fouling removal, but it is sort of a long process involving multiple applications. I have very limited experience in using Copper Remover for CN fouling, but it seemed to work. At least, I was pulling out some blue-green coloring on cloth patches, so something was happening.

I don’t remember who sells it but there is also an electrolytic method on the market, sort of like reverse electroplating, to remove bore fouling. That should work well on any type of metal fouling. I have no experience with it.


#6

[quote=“DennisK”]Shooter’s Choice sells a product called “Copper Remover” It works quite well for metal fouling removal, but it is sort of a long process involving multiple applications. I have very limited experience in using Copper Remover for CN fouling, but it seemed to work. At least, I was pulling out some blue-green coloring on cloth patches, so something was happening.

I don’t remember who sells it but there is also an electrolytic method on the market, sort of like reverse electroplating, to remove bore fouling. That should work well on any type of metal fouling. I have no experience with it.[/quote]
I use Shooters Choice copper remover but I have just checked my bottle and it doesn’t state nickel. Thats why I suggested checking with their technical people. Hoppes no9 gets lead and copper out so its a broad spectrum cleaner but again it requires multiple applications (many!)because its not that strong.


#7

OK thanks everybody. It’s because I have a bunch of 1962 AMA M/48 which it was the plan to shoot in my model of 1917, but only if a fouling problem won’t ruin its precision. I’ll try out the Forrest foam because its available here and also the Proshot copper remover. Ballistol has a weak copper removing effect if left in the barrel for some days btw and my standard recipe for cleaning my Garand is to spray a bit down the barrel before storing after shooting 1984 AMA, which has a tombac/GM jacket.
And now back to our regular programming :-)
Soren