Coiled Case Cartridges


#1

Hi,

I recently acquired a number of these coiled case cartridges. I don’t know much about them since this is not one of my collecting specialties. I have tentatively identified them, in order, as 577 Snyder, 577/450 Martini Henry, and 500 3 inch Black Powder Express.

I am getting ready to catalog them into my inventory and would like to know where they were manufactured, in which time frame they were used, and some idea as to their value for my records. Any miscellaneous history would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

Heavyiron


#2

Hi heavyiron

these coiled cases were made originally to Boxer’s Patent which was assigned to Eley Bros.
The .577 Snider (not Snyder) you have is commercial not military production which was paper-covered. It was available from Eley Brothers from 1867 until about 1923 when Eley went out of the metallic ctg business. Eley did not make ‘solid-drawn’ cases until the mid 1870’s.
The .577/.450 Martini-Henry was first manufactured in 1871 after adoption by the British Army & could have been made in Britain by Eley Bros or Kynoch Limited, or in India by various arsenals or the Colonial Ammunition Company in Australia.
The .500 x 3 inch coiled case was in commercial use by 1869 & available only by Eley Bros until about 1923. Bullet weight is 340 grains Express bullet with HP (usually with wood peg) or 380 gr solid bullet. Also known as 40 gauge in 1860’s and loaded with 3.5 drachms (120 grains) of black powder & was considered suitable for hunting most types of deer.


#3

JohnP-C,

Thank you very much for the information. It was very interesting.

Does anyone have any idea as to value?

Heavyiron


#4

These run around $10 to $15 for the Snider and the MH, and $30+ for the .500-3"


#5

Thank you Guy!


#6

I know nothing about these cartridges but they are very cool. Great pictures and historical information.

John, I’m curious what “HP” stands for in this sentence. "Bullet weight is 340 grains Express bullet with HP (usually with wood peg) or 380 gr solid bullet. " Does it stand for High Pressure? Just guessing.


#7

HP = Hollow Point.
The plug served 2 purposes, 1) keeping the hole open (un mashed) during handling, and 2) iniating expansion once the round hit simething (acts like a wedge).

Todays Nosler “Ballistic Tip” Hornady “A-Max” and the Remington “Bronze Point” are all a spitzer hollow point design with a protective plug/expansion starter fitted to the tip.


#8

[quote=“heavyiron”]Hi,

I recently acquired a number of these coiled case cartridges. I don’t know much about them since this is not one of my collecting specialties. I have tentatively identified them, in order, as 577 Snyder, 577/450 Martini Henry, and 500 3 inch Black Powder Express.


The Snider could be a second pattern Canadian made at Dominion Cartridge Factory, Quebec, Canada c1886-91. First pattern had the paper cover.

I am getting ready to catalog them into my inventory and would like to know where they were manufactured, in which time frame they were used, and some idea as to their value for my records. Any miscellaneous history would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

Heavyiron[/quote]


#9

Thanks so much Tailgunner !

Jason


#10

Heavyiron -

If the .577/.450 MH has a small hole cut in the case side, that would identify it as a Mk III Rifle round. The holes come in a variety of shapes: oval, rectangular, and diamond were all standard. If there is NO inspection hole (put there to show the existence of an inner reinforcing strip of brass) it may still be a Mk. III, made by CAC in Australia.

Also, look at the rivet around the primer. There may be stampings - one or two lines, or the ubiquitous “broad arrow” of the Royal Arsenal. Brass and copper rivets were used.

Lastly it looks like there is only one neck cannelure, although I have seen several that have the upper cannelure extremely close to the case mouth. The latter is also typical of CAC manufacture.