Collection is a mess


#1

My collection is a mess.
I’ve collected several hundred single rifle and pistol rounds and another 100-200 shotgun shells, full and empty boxes, powder cans, and other various related items.

Problem is, I started collecting back when my life was much less complicated, no kids, great work schedule etc…Now I find myself unable to tend to this mass stuff that has taken over a corner of my garage. Nothing has ever been cataloged. Most of it sits in plastic baggies labeled with nothing more than caliber,and separated into boxes for pistol/rifle, metric/US/British.

I don’t want to get rid of the ‘stuff’, but would like to have it somewhat organized. Cataloging is out of the question for the next several years, just won’t have the time.

What I’d like to do is find some way to store these items in a more attractive manner, like maybe in some stackable, wood,glass/acrylic cases. Anyone know of a good source for these types of display cases? Hopefully not too expensive.

Would appreciate ideas.

Thank you -


#2

This was talked about in a recent forum thread here: http://iaaforum.org/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=7279&hilit=file Flat files were deemed to be the attractive and functional option, and you can sometimes find these on Craigslist as “blueprint drawers” from people selling blueprint printers, etc…


#3

Squib

Rather than looking for permanent, expensive, storage at this time, why not consider something more temporary. I like the plastic trays used to store and ship medical samples in test tubes. They are not too expensive, they are stackable and very portable, not too big to be unwieldy, and when you finally catalog and permanently store your collection, they can be tossed. There is a big supplier in So Cal, and maybe even one in your area.

Ray


#4

I use plastic drawers and corrugated cartoon


#5

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Rather than looking for permanent, expensive, storage at this time, why not consider something more temporary. I like the plastic trays used to store and ship medical samples in test tubes. They are not too expensive, they are stackable and very portable, not too big to be unwieldy, and when you finally catalog and permanently store your collection, they can be tossed. There is a big supplier in So Cal, and maybe even one in your area.

Ray[/quote]
That’s a pretty good idea. A temporary, semi-organized way to store my mess. Ever have any issues with ammunition corrosion interacting with the plastic? I’ve got plenty of open drawer space to store them in, but have seen a few folks mention that oak can have a negative effect ones collection. Is the problem from direct contact with oak, or can it happen by having them stored in the vicinity of oak as well?

The steel cabinet option looks way too sterile for my lifestyle.


#6

Squib–Oak is to be avoided period. It isn’t the direct contact of laying next to the oak, but just being in a closed space near oak. It is the Tannic Acid fumes that come out of the oak that cause the problem. You could try to seal the oak with a polyurethane type product, but it is almost impossible to do it 100% gas-tight. You said your cartridges are in something like little zip-lock bags. If you keep them in air-tight plastic bags in your oak cabinet, you might not have any problems, but, personally, I would just not use oak for cartridge storage at all.


#7

squib

AFAIK the plastic trays are inert since they’re made for storing and transporting medical samples. I’ve never had a problem with corrosion. You probably can’t tell from the photo, but they do have a hinged lid. They come in at least 2 sizes. I’ve stacked them as many as 20 high. For me, the biggest advantage is that they’re portable. Take them anywhere without worrying about spilling the contents.

Ray


#8

Ray,
My ‘Google-Fu’ is usually pretty good, but I’ve not had any success locating these types of trays using a variety of keyword combinations. Could you please provide a link?

-Squib

[quote=“RayMeketa”]squib

AFAIK the plastic trays are inert since they’re made for storing and transporting medical samples. I’ve never had a problem with corrosion. You probably can’t tell from the photo, but they do have a hinged lid. They come in at least 2 sizes. I’ve stacked them as many as 20 high. For me, the biggest advantage is that they’re portable. Take them anywhere without worrying about spilling the contents.

Ray[/quote]


#9

squib

Check your email.

ray


#10

I have these plastic tubes

regards
gyrojet


#11

I’ve been assembling my cartridge collection (singles) in a better display manner in my 5-drawer blueprint file lately and wanted to let people know that I’ve been using tiny Aspen dowels in a unique way to set up the vertical dividers to keep cartridges from rolling. I noticed that the local Home Depot had either Oak dowels or a soft wood mix dowel from China that was primarily Populous Tremuloidies according to the label (Aspen). The Aspen acidity is very low and it’s closer to the base end of the spectrum so I went with it. I laid out the dowels vertically at a certain spacing on top of a soft wood 1/4" panel board, and I glued them down. Then I covered the dowels tightly with green felt and put this in the drawer. I’ll take some step by step pictures when I make one of these for the next drawer and post them here. And maybe I can finally have the only other IAA collector who is local to me over for a visit to see the cartridges laid out proper (Dave Kuchta), hang in there Dave!.


#12

To have another cartridge collector living in the same town with you - that would be nice. We tend to be spread pretty thin in my experience - thank Goodness (or was that Al Gore?) for the internet.


#13

DK

I have considered making drawer liners like you described but the cost of good wooden dowels makes it prohibitive. Are the cheap ones OK? It seems to me like everything from China was made with or washed in urine. Like corrugated cardboard, for example.

Ray


#14

Ray - I had to be selective when picking out the dowels. Half of the dowels at Home Depot of this type were either bent or broken, but I managed to get enough after inspecting several. The oak ones were more expensive and were better quality, but obviously the wrong type of wood.


#15

One more are the flat plastic Plano boxes with dividers. All hardware and sporting shops carry them, they come in all sizes, if you get the thinnest ones with the most number of movable dividers you can not only handle individual rounds but boxes on the flat . I have them stacked 10 high with no problem. Eventually I will make a divider shelves so they can be stored out of the way but easy acess. My 2 cents Vic


#16


I second this idea! It is what I mainly use right now. It is excellent for organization, and allows growth to be really easy as you can just move the interior boxes around.

These are amazing if you ever what to show off your collection too at a place other than your home as they are so easy to carry around. Also are super easy to store in an organized way in the corner of your garage.

You can also get cheap small dessicant packs to put in each little drawer to keep moisture more at bay.

http://www.amazon.com/Plano-3650-Size-Tackle-Box/dp/B000E3FKTE


#17

When it comes to housing my collection, I’m as simple as it gets (unlike Gyrojet’s plastic labled tubes that looks really cool, or John Moss’s set-up which is pretty awsome if I might say). Singles i just keep in the MTM Case Guard plastic boxes of 100. They’re manageable, sturdy, stackable and I place a sticker/label on top with the manufacturers written on the label. Packets and boxes of ammo that I store away are in surplus .30 & .50 cal. ammo cans.


#18

Leon

When using the MTM plastic boxes you have to be careful or you’ll rub a bright ring around the cartridge where it meets the black inner tray. This will happen especially when you transport the boxes by automobile. The vibrations from the car engine and road surface will result in a ring-around-the-case in very short order. Even the act of moving the boxes around your house will eventually do the same thing.

The inner trays can be adjusted for height, to a certain degree. Shooters do this to accomodate the particular cartridge, not to prevent the ring, but to make the cartridges more accessible. The ring is not a concern to shooters but is to a collector.

JMHO

Ray


#19

Examples of mild ring-around-the case. OK for shooting but not something you want to see on your three-hundred dollar 7.62x39 Lugashistan.

Ray


#20

Ray,

Thanks for the heads-up. I’ve been storing my collection in the Case Guards for over 20 years and I’ve yet to come across the problem you mentioned…yet. I’ll keep a close eye on my collection for this problem.