Cracked necks in pistol ammo

Why is pistol ammo less prone to having necks cracked (comparatively to rifle ammo)?

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Straight case shapes require much less deformation of the material, resulting in less remaining stress.
Its not so much pistol versus rifle, but straight versus bottlenecked.

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How about things like Tokarev 7.62x25mm which is bottle necked? They also are less likely to have cracked necks.

As I understand it, the material is not as significantly stretched to form a pistol case compared to a longer rifle case.

This leaves less stress in the brass used to manufacture a pistol case.

From what I have read, some makes of Cold war era Tokarev cases have been known to crack.

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I have a lot of cracked Tokarev cases.

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Ditto 7.63 Mauser. Jack

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OK, so the necked pistol ammo is as much prone to crack as rifle ammo. My oversight. I pay more attention to rifle ammo, hence my skewed view.

I think it has more to do with the makeup of the cartridge: who/when/where it was made.

I have seen MANY Russian made [Russian Federation, not necessarily made IN Russia?] 7.62x25 Tokarev rounds with split necks, right out of the “spam can”, (as many as 40%), while I have never seen Chinese made Tokarev rounds of the same era of manufacture with split necks.
Neither have I seen Czech made Tokarev/PPSh rounds with split necks, and I shot quite a lot of that, made in the late 1940s’ to possibly the early 1960s’.

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As others have correctly answered, cartridge brass typically has less work hardening when forming pistol (usually short, often straight or semi-straight wall) versus bottleneck rifle cases. Brass “work hardens”, and needs to be annealed to restore malleability. If you investigate how typical rifle brass (e.g., .30-'06 or .308 Winchester) is made, you’ll find many annealing steps during the process. If a manufacturer can cut out one or more of these steps, that saves time and cost. Of course, the quality (metallurgy) of the brass plays a big role too. Even 7.62x25 or 7.65x21 (.30 Luger) brass has fewer manufacturing steps than .30-06.

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Joe: The 7.62 Tokarev and the 7.65 Luger have fewer manufacturing steps than the .30-06 but they also have more steps than the 9 m/m Luger or the .45 ACP. Jack

Yes… they do.