Czech 7.92 x 57

Am I correct in thinking that the VIII on the attached photo of a Czech 7.92 x 57 represents the month of manufacture?

I see on “Municiones de la Guerra Civil Española” that Czech produced ammunition has been recovered from Spanish Civil War sites, particularly on El Frente Del Segre. Does anyone know if this ammunition was supplied to the Republicans or the Franquistas? image

Yes, it usually represents the month. What is odd that there are a couple of rarely found Czech rounds in 7.9 with the same format, but with Roman Numerals above XII (12) on the headstamp. I never have heard an explanation for that. The vast majority of Czech rounds with this headstamp style, whether “M”, “SB” or “Z” are only numbered I thru XII.

John Moss

Hi Badgerbag, the government of the Spanish Republic imported 7,92x57 ammunition from Czechoslovakia in large quantities, along with the VZ-24 rifles.
Remains of it can be found on virtually all fronts of the Spanish Civil War.
I accompany the image of a box from my collection.
Ximo.
sb7,92

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Many thanks. It’s always great to know the history behind these items.
Tim

To show three shells from the factory
Československé muniční a kovodělné závody a.s Bratislava Československo.

The resolution above XII is for export.

Buyer Romania, these bullets found in the encampment of the Romanian army.

Sincerely, Franta.M export.PNG

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The next question, one I never got answered when I was collecting 7.9 x 57 and had two or three Czech rounds with Roman Numerals above “XII” (12) on the headstamp, is does anyone have an documentation about the meaning of these number like XV (15), XVIII (18) and XIX (19)? They are al relatively scarce headstamps, unlike the normal Czech rounds, where the Roman Number obviously indicates the month, being normally found (quite commonly) with numbers 1 thru 12.

John Moss

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In the name “Československé muniční a kovodělné závody a.s Bratislava Československo”, the words “kovodělné závod” mean “metalworking factory”. I have bayonets with that “M” in semi-circle, which I think stands for “Moravia”. What else did that factory make?

Vlad - This Bratislava factory also made charger clips, at least ones for the German Model 88 7.8 mm Rifle and Carbine. I have several full ones left over from when I had one of these carbines. Cartridges are headstamped " 19 / M / 33 / III " (the “M” has the circle, open at the bottom of the letter, around it). The Chargers have the same mark. However, they are stamped so lightly, that it could be easily missed. One of mine is so light that I thought it was without markings, until I put a very good magnifying glass on it. I assume that the likely made other chargers are well.

John Moss

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Could the M stand for the Czech word of ammunition?
The former Georg Roth ammunition factory at Bratislava became part of Zbrojovka Brno, which used the well known Z inside a circle (or barrel icon). The ammunition factory used an M instead of the Z. What we see in the headstamp is a simplified version due to what was possible on a bunter. I tend to believe that we have an M for ammunition, just like the Z for arms
.

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While I don’t really no, I, for one, could not dispute that the “M” stands for Ammunition, or perhaps for the Munitions branch of the company. Their name translates to English basically as “Czechoslovakian Munitions and Metal Working Factory,” so the “M” could delineate the name of the ammunition-producing section. I think it might be a very good call by Peelen.

I forgot, in mention their manufacture of charges, which may have carried the “M” marking simply because they were arms and ammunition-related products (it would be interesting to know, if they made any, how they marked metal products that has nothing to do with arms and ammunition?), that I have had the Czech-pattern 7.9 x 57 stripped clips intended for the Czech Versions, like v. 24, of the German Model 98 rifle and carbine, as well as those for the M88.

John M.

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https://forum.cartridgecollectors.org/t/7-9m-m-js-sporting-cartridges-by-fn-and-povazska-bystrica/5125