Czech 8mm Tracer/ Incendiary EZ Cutaway


#1

Metak Sa Eksplozivno - Zapalijiuim Zrnom EZ, or a repaired German B-Patrone - V
Headstamp 11//55/
Intrestingly two different designs for the internal firing pin/ explosive cap. Also the pins them selves are sharp like a pencil, where as the orginal B-Patrone posted yesterday was sharp like the end of a nail. wolfgang


#2

Nice job!! However the EZ loading is Yugoslavian “remounted” German B-Patronen bullets, without tracer. Also, despite some sources, this is not a -v- loading. JH


#3

Is there just very slight variances in the evolution or manufacturing process of the bullet that explains the minor differences?


#4

Thanks for the correction haak48, the info came from another website back from sept 06. There is just enough info on the web to get someone in trouble. Happy to clear this up.
Matt, hoping someone else can awnser your question, this one caught me by suprize. (I’m blaming the one who sold them to me, ha)
Does anybody know what is in the mixture for explosive cap? wolfgang


#5

I seem to recall it is in Kent’s and Micke’s books.

Hans


#6

An example,

Rgds


#7

In WW1 the Germans had a Varity of explosive rounds for MG’s used in Zeppelins and airplanes

Would like to show a few of them.

This one is called the “Lufteinschießpatrone” After firing the air pressed a spring held primer against a pin who ignited a fixed time delay who let explode the black powder charge inside the bullet.
It was made for letting a pilot know were his MG bullets went by air battles during WW1.
Later the tracer was developed.
(For an exact explanation see page 18/19 of the German 7,9 military ammunition book of Kent)



This one is called a “Brandgeschoss” in Kents book; cartridge with a conical point (see page 24) unfortunately I cannot show you a cut.

This one is called the “Alder Patrone”. A very complicated bullet. After firing a sleeve get pushed back by the barrel, after the bullet leaves the barrel two half rings fall of, and the bullet is armed. If the tip of the bullet hit something, it will explode.
(For an exact explanation see page 26/27 of the German 7,9 military ammunition book of Kent)


This one is called the “Eisenach Sprengpatrone” The cartridge has a tombak bullet and you can identify it on the head stamp of the “Gewehr Prufüngs Kommission”. This one has a red annulus color in stead of the normal black one as used on the Spr.
(For an exact explanation see page 29/30 of the German 7,9 military ammunition book of Kent)



#8

Thanks for a very informative thread.


#9

[quote=“dutch”]In WW1 the Germans had a Varity of explosive rounds for MG’s used in Zeppelins and airplanes

[/quote]

You have a very very good collection !!
Very scarce ctges
JP