"D-Day"


#1

I once served with quite a few of the veterans of D-Day, tragically the ones I knew,are all gone now.To the remaining ones still out there,God Bless.
Respectfully
Charles.J.Wells (Jack)
Sgm.USA. Ret.


#2

My Father-in-Law was there, a 19 year old ship’s Corpsman stranded on the beach because his LST was hit.

I know 1 or 2 that were there and still live. They were a special bunch of people, that generation.


#3

Thank you. The new culture wants to forget all of the days related to war. They keep good track of minority holidays but D-Day , not a mention. Does anyone remember VE and VJ day ? How about Amistice day ? AOL news has all the latest on the Hollywood crowd including what they are wearing today but not a mention of D-Day and all the young men dead ; average age 22 years.

Is it worth death so that fools can be free ? Only God knows.


#4

My uncle Harry must have been one of the first to set foot. He parachuted in ahead of the gliders at Pegasus Bridge to secure the perimeter.
He survived the war but worked after the war in construction and asbestos got him.

For those that have never been its quite a place. The cemetries literally stop you in your tracks when you first walk through the gate.


#5

There are some who remember. The nearby air field put on a D-Day show this past weekend. There were WWII warbirds roaring overhead repeatedly on both the 4th and 5th. Love that sound!


#6

Real Americans remember Normandy and D-Day. I always wanted to visit there, but never made it out there. I did go to the US Cemetary in Luxembourg. It was closed when we got there, so we visited the German cemetary down the road from it, which had no locked gate on it. Sobering, I guess, is the best word for these places. I was struck by how many graves in the German cemetary had the inscription “Hier ruhe ein Deutsche Soldat unbekannt.” Pardon me if my grammar is wrong. It was in 1972 that I visited there. I might have small details of the inscription wrong. A shame so many young men on both sides had to die fighting for or against such an evil concept as the Third Reich represented. When I see on the news the flag-covered caskets of more young men coming from the Middle East, it is clear that evil still persists in the world, and that there are brave young men willing to meet it on the battlefield.

Mankind has learned little in the last 70 years!


#7

History has tought me one thing; men like war. Patton said " it is good that war is so horrible because we love it so". One new aspect since the last great war is the “limited war”. We now go to war at the whim of the president.

“Real Americans” ?

Fast slipping away.


#8

Clearly, men do like war. But then, war is mankind’s oldest team sport, the ultimate game. Men have been waging war upon each other for thousands of years, ever since they began living in groups large enough to enable organized combat.

Whether the enemy is evil, or not, war seems to be an inherent part of man’s nature. At least we haven’t had another nuclear war in the last six decades.


#9

Matter of time, just a matter of time.


#10

RESPECT !!! to all vetereans, God bless them and their families.


#11

[quote=“VinceGreen”]My uncle Harry must have been one of the first to set foot. He parachuted in ahead of the gliders at Pegasus Bridge to secure the perimeter.
He survived the war but worked after the war in construction and asbestos got him.

For those that have never been its quite a place. The cemetries literally stop you in your tracks when you first walk through the gate.[/quote]

Was he in the 9th parachute ?

There has never been a movie made in the US about these brave fellows. Are there any British movies about them ?


#12

As positive and decent as this thread is, it still needs an ammunition angle to stay up, so as to be fair to other closed threads.

Thanks


#13

I’m sorry, but we can be TOO dogmatic on this “ammo angle” thing. Commemorating the heroism and hardship of all the men of all the countries that fought to keep as much of the world free as possible automatically has an ammunition angle. With those men and their deeds, few of us would be collecting ammunition under Hitler, Tojo and Mussolini!

There is your ammunition angle.


#14

Well, I certainly don’t mind. It’s just when one thread is locked and somebody asks “what about that other non-ammo thread”, I just wanted to make mention. I think everybody pretty much accepts that decent commemorative threads like this which refer to events that affect everyone’s freedom and right to own ammo & bear arms are usually ok.


#15

Matt - that’s a perfectly reasonable reply. I generally agree with the rule of keeping the subject ammunition related - after all, that’s what we are all about. Unfortunately, when I stqrt rambling onsometimes, I lose sight of that myself, and freely admit I do. However, there are subjects that, from time to time, either really need to be addressed or simply should be addressed that do not always comply with our “ammunition only” rule, and I think most of us can recognize those subjects and do not equate their presence to an unfair policy.

You administrators have a tough job, and I recognize that. Thank you for your polite and well-reasoned response, and for your work on this Forum. I mean that seriously.

John


#16

I second that motion John