Danish 7.62 blanks

I was wondering if these 50rd boxes of Danish blanks are just typical blanks, or if they are launching cartridges?

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Matt,

These appear to be noise blanks:

The boxes say “LØS PT” which means blank cart.

The Danish launching cartridge was used with the ENERGA rifle grenade and packed together with them (one cartridge attached to the shaft of the grenade) and in 10 rds. boxes but not in 50 rrds. boxes.
7.62x63 (= .30-06) was replaced in common service with the introduction of the 7.62x51 NATO since 1962.

These blanks from 1991 were for the Royal Danish Life Guards which used their Gevær M/50 (= M1 Garand) until 1995.

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Hi Matt

Do you have the boxes? It would be nice to see the headstamps.

Defender - are the “Royal Danish Life Guards” sort of the bodyguard
unit for important people in the Danish Government? When in Copenhagen
in 1972, I remember a circle of Government Buildings with one street entering
it and one leaving it. At one edge of the circle next to the street was a building,
with rooms off a passage way underneath the overhang of the building. There
were soldiers in there in dress uniform, and I recall one on each side of a big
doorway on the other side of the circle as guards. Many stacks of M1 (G50)
rifles, three to a stack, were outside in front of the rooms, under the overhang.

It struck me as incredible that they seemed to be unguarded. Unfortunately,
in my country, they would last about 10 minutes before someone stopped a car,
threw a stack or two in the car, and speed off.

At any rate, were those troops part of the “Royal Danish Life Guards?” I have
a Garand rifle made in Italy for Denmark, including a Danish made bayonet. It
has a anchor stamped on it, so I presumed it was for the Navy. It makes me
very interested in the discussion of “HA” 8-shot M1 clips, as I have one of them.
It still seems to be up in the air who made those clips - diverse opinions on the
thread. Wonder if there is anyway one of our Danish friends could find out for
sure. Maybe the TØJHUS Museum might know?

John Moss

I don’t have the boxes, just noticed them in a Gunbroker listing.

John,

H.A. - Horle Arms Co.
Deep River, CT

This info comes direct from a man that worked there making the clips.

He also sent the fellow that I know who spoke with him, this die cut and note. I am still trying to obtain it unsuccessfully.

Joe

M1 Garand progressive stamping Horle Arms Co. Deep River CT.
Deep River CT

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@ JohnMoss
For some information about the Guards have a look here please: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Life_Guards_(Denmark)
The guards are much more than just decoration and photo motives for tourists. Nowadays equipped with M4-clones from Colt Canada (ex-Diemaco) with bayonets. They are the only unit in Denmark that still uses mountable bayonets.

@ Joe
Great information. So my doubts were always justified -> .30-06 clips with HA marking really Danish?

Defender - thanks for pointing out the Wikipedia site. I use it
sometimes, and find it usually pretty correct, despite the fact
that anyone can add to answers on it. I didn’t think of it in this
instance. I see I was probably correct in my thoughts on who
they were, but simply incomplete. I NEVER thought of them as
simply “photo motives for tourists,” anymore than I would with
our own U.S. Army Honor Guard soldiers, who are, among other things,
the ceremonial guard at Arlington National Cemetery. Men of
these units are a special brand of soldiers, regardless of country,
and deserve great respect. I didn’t see any “performance” in the
short time I was at what I call, out of lack of knowledge for a real
name, the “Government Circle” in Copenhagen, but I saw some
individuals, and their dress and manner was superb.

Thanks again for the good information. I also was happy to get
the information about mountable bayonets.

John

John, the TØJHUS Museum - if they still have somebody who knows simply will not tell or refuse any cooperation.
The the past decades they have turned into a gun and military avoiding entity. And even worse they have destroyed large amountts of their unbelievable collection of small arms (I was told they did with ammo long before). Means what you have seen once in the 2nd floor is almost all gone and scrapped (not stored away!!!).
From a civilized point of view they are comotting a major crime there.

I am new to this, so please excuse me if I jumped in wrong place. I have some Haerens Materielkommando skarppatron m/48 7.62 rounds. Not sure what they are… appear to be very close to 30.06. Any and all info would be greatly appreciated Other markings 03-ama-82 81h01. 07-82

M/48 are indeed 30-06 Garand ammo.

Cupro-nickel jacet:
https://www.arma-dania.dk/public/timeline/_ad_patroner_view.php?editid1=62

Copper jacket:
https://www.arma-dania.dk/public/timeline/_ad_patroner_view.php?editid1=168

All cartridges used by the Danes:
https://www.arma-dania.dk/public/timeline/_ad_patroner_list.php

EOD - that is distressing news about the Danish Arms Museum in
Copenhagen. I was there is 1972, and the second floor, among other
things, had more wheel lock rifles that I had ever seen or heard of in one
place. It was a very good arms museum, although better for antique arms
than for modern ones.

Destroying any of those arms was, for sure, a crime against the history and
culture of Europe. The people responsible for it should be in prison.

John Moss

John, welcome to the European spirit!

Just prison for those who did this?

I as Dane am more inclined towards an often repeated severe public flogging!
And yes thousands of ireplaceable and in many cases unique weapons got dumped the kiln at the local steel works.

The newest thing here is old documents that has been digitised is burned. I mean hundreds of years old maps and drawings up in smoke? Why not flatten the museums and make a digital/virtual show instead?

Glad i will bead in 15, the world has turned ugly.