Dupont powder label help

Hello all, Picked this frame up last week. Would like to know if anyone is familiar with the labels in the two separate pictures. Also, would like any comments as to authenticity.

RookieDupont frame
Dupont label 1
Dupont label 2

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They are original. Dupont had a whole room of label that they have sold off over the last 65+ years. These are mostly post 1900. Makes a great display.
Cheers,
Will.

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Will.
Were you saying that Dupont knew how cool they looked and they made many extra just to cash in on the trend or that Dupont overproduced labels unintentionally and sold them of slowly from storage? Keeping a room full of labels for 65+ years implies the first intentional overproduction. One has to keep order, records, proper humidity and pay staff to do so. In my company any extra labels are dumped immediately, of course they don’t look as cool as the ones in this thread.

Thank you very much will. You made my day

Hi Vlad.
I made a trip down a number of years ago but spent all of my time in the library photographing labels and researching. Aparantly the label room was in a stone building. It had a stable temperature and humidity which would have been perfect for long term preservation. The labels dated back to the early days of Dupont. Over the years I have managed to pick up a number most of which are similar to Rookies labels. However, I did manage to get a couple of early ones (1830/40 period). They sold off the labels in their gift store for decades. One day someone figured out that they were selling labels that they did not have in their collection so that practice stopped. No more labels for sale.

A word of warning to powder tin collectors. During the 1950’ and 60’s, a number of people bought labels and put them on any gunpowder tin that didn’t have a label and then sold them as originals. There are MANY of these tins around. If the tin doesn’t look right and the label is later than the tin, it’s one of these. Caveat Emptor.

Cheers,
Will.

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There was a fellow from Queensbury , NY, he is gone now. Had a huge collection of powder cans and all manner of powder containers and old loading tools. He had a very large quantity of these labels and new old stock Dupont cans. he sold them at gun shows you could buy the unlabeled cans and labels separately. He only sold them separately. He was a character, had a pet mountain lion. Had several mobile homes on the property that were the storage for the powder can, flask, tool collection. And one for the lion that was completely fenced. Town highway dept. provided road kill venison and other critters for Lucy.

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I would never argue with Adye-White about anything having to do with antique powder cans, percussion caps, British pistol cartridges, or Canadian beer. However, the small upper right “Golden Pheasant” label may be original in the sense that Du Pont printed it in modern times (in addition to old antique versions of course). Years ago in the 1970s another collector and I visited the Du Pont powder mill that was set up as a wonderful attraction. We toured the place and wound up in the gift shop where they were selling small red and green power tins made of plaster as souvenirs. The tins used these labels and the shop was happy to sell me as many of the plaster tins and labels as I wanted. I bought several of the tins and 50 labels, thinking they would be neat collector trading stock. I have 37 left. They are 2.3 inches high and 1.8 inches wide. I will be happy to give one to anybody who sends me a stamped, addressed envelope to PO Box 665, Orange Park, FL 32067-0665. Foreigners can just email me and I’ll bring them to SLICS 2022.

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