Experimental Frankford Arsenal .223 duplex


#1

One of the most exciting x-rays my dentist has taken for me (and its not a 7.62x51mm)! Brass case with nickel primer and red primer seal. Headstamp is REM-UMC 223. The first bullet has a green tip and milled cannlure. Both bullets are GM. I believe that this is one of the first .223 duplex cartridge loaded (Dave Hughes in The M16 Rifle and its Cartridges claims that less than 20 rounds were loaded in late 1962).

NATO Dave


#2

That is awesome. I did not realize that a duplex round was ever developed until now. Very cool x-ray!

Jason


#3

The angle on the base of the second projo is very interesting. I wonder what the average spread would be over 50 yards or so.


#4

Dave, great cartridge! Thanks to you and your dentist.


#5

Dave, what does yours weigh?

joe


#6

Very cool! Thanks.


#7

Joe
Total weight of my specimen is 189gr. Hughes gives the front and rear bullet weights as 33gr and 34gr respectively.

Jon
I don’t have any information on the .223 duplex but second bullet of the 7.62x51mm M198 duplex round also has an angled base. Figures I’ve seen for the mean radius at 100 yards for the front and rear bullet of the M198 are about 1.5" and 11" respectively.

NATO Dave


#8

Other duplex cartridges used the tilted base bullets to increase dispersion and hit probability. The four Cal .30 Project Salvo cartridges and the 25 Winchester come to mind. They go back years before the 5.56 Duplex cartridges. The 7.62mm experimental (FAT314) was actually adopted as the M198 but was never considered a significant combat advantage over the standard M59 or M80 Ball. It was short lived.

The concept of two or more bullets in a single cartridge is like the Energizer Bunny. It just keeps going and going and going.

Ray


#9

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Other duplex cartridges used the tilted base bullets to increase dispersion and hit probability. The four Cal .30 Project Salvo cartridges and the 25 Winchester come to mind. They go back years before the 5.56 Duplex cartridges. The 7.62mm experimental (FAT314) was actually adopted as the M198 but was never considered a significant combat advantage over the standard M59 or M80 Ball. It was short lived.

The concept of two or more bullets in a single cartridge is like the Energizer Bunny. It just keeps going and going and going.

Ray[/quote]

The philosophy for Duplex (and triplex) loads seem to be “we know that our soldiers never hit anything that they aim at so if we make the bullet(s) go somewhere else then maybe one of them will hit something!”.

gravelbelly


#10

It’s called “Spray And Pray”.


#11

Dave,

Great item and awesome x-ray!

Is it just the way the x-ray came out or does it seem the rear projectile is of a homogeneous construction? The front projectile clearly has a jacket and core though it looks less apparently so where it is seated in the case mouth. Perhaps it’s just the resolution of the image with the brass case being passed through as well?

DaveE


#12

Dave E
Although I can’t be sure, I think it’s most likely an artifact of the x-ray image. I’ll post another image shortly that points to this. I have an extensive reference collection for an older x-ray system, but I’m still learning to interpret the images from the system my dentist currently uses.

NATO Dave


#13

Instead, the German Army ( Wehrmacht) believed in “Volume of Fire” with its HROF MG34 and 42…Get enough rounds over to the enemy, and some are sure to hit…The US principle of " Hard Rain"
with the M1917 and the M1919, was the same.

The Duplex and Triplex loads are a Over-complicated solution to a Simple Problem…Either teach /train your soldiers to shoot well (USMC) or Fire so much lead (MG) that it don’t matter whether your riflemen can shoot or not.
Personally, I prefer a combination of the Two…HROF MGs to keep the enemy down, and good riflemen to take out the enemy individually.

Doc AV