"FC" headstamp


#1

I just noticed this on the head stamp codes on small arms ammunition part of this site.

"FC Departmento de la Industrial Militar, Mexico City, Mexico 1

FC Federal Cartridge Corp., Anoka, MN 55303 (also produced in Germany and Austria for Federal) 1

FC Prvi Partizan, Titovo, Uzice 31000, Yugoslavia 1 "

I thought that the second FC head stamp was interesting becase of also produced in Germany and Austria for Federal …

Does anyone have more information on this and can expand on what’s in the quote?

Thank you

Glenn


#2

Glenn - pretty easy. When Federal first started expanding their line from .22s, etc., into all the pistol calibers, some of the first ammo they sold in calibers like .25, 32, 380 and 9mm were not made by them, but rather by Hirtenberg in Austria and by Geco in Germany.

Later, I will add to this with the scan of a few box back labels showing the country of origin, and perhaps some headstamps of the ammo in the boxes, which look pretty ordinary like “FC” headstamps do.

The “FC” made in Mexico, likely actually by Industrias Technos (Aguila brand when sold commercially), are a different format, but sometimes hard to tell from Federal military or police contract ammo.

The Yugoslav version was made by Pivi Partizan, reportedly for Mexico and only on 9mm Para ammunition, but the box label is in English. It was never sold that way in the United States though, so the story may be true that it was for Mexico. It is the same headstamp style as the Mexican “FC” stuff.

Hope this helps, and it probably will more so when I get the boxes scanned and Joe gets them posted to the thread. Probably not until tomorrow some time.


#3

[quote=“Glenn”]I just noticed this on the head stamp codes on small arms ammunition part of this site.

"FC Departmento de la Industrial Militar, Mexico City, Mexico 1

FC Federal Cartridge Corp., Anoka, MN 55303 (also produced in Germany and Austria for Federal) 1

FC Prvi Partizan, Titovo, Uzice 31000, Yugoslavia 1 "

I thought that the second FC head stamp was interesting becase of also produced in Germany and Austria for Federal …

Does anyone have more information on this and can expand on what’s in the quote?

Thank you

Glenn[/quote]

#2 is the Pvri Partizan, but #1 & #3 ?


By dgfm at 2009-04-26[/img]


#4

DGFM - Your Number 1 is Mexican and your Number 3 is American, made before Federal met with NATO Standard, or however that works. At any rate it is American military pre-NATO mark. The Number 2 is Yugoslavian, like you said.


#5

GRACIAS AMIGO !!!, hope next SLICS I could be there to shake your hand, does my friends Horacio, Roberto and Federico bring good ctgs. for you ? if not I will take those crooks and give him what they deserve, jajajajaj !!!.


#6

Unfortunately, All of our Argentine Amigos at SLICS had their luggage sent to Dallas in error by the airline, and their, the TPA seized all the ammunition for destruction. I don’t know the final outcome of that. They had only a few empty boxes and a very few cartridges. I finally did get an FLB .40 S&W round though, although a dummy. A very sad event, not so much for those that would have loved to have had more South American items to go through, but also for Horacio, Alberto and Fede. I am sure it destracted much from their trip.

It was sure great to see Horacio and Roberto again though, and I think it was the first time I met Fede! It was a great social show. Not much for cartridges in my field, but wonderful to see all our friends.


#7

As the ammunition was legally imported, will they be eligible for any compensation?


#8

Falcon - Conmpensation? Are you kidding me? I would say not a chance.
Even if they did - suppose you had a 70-150 Winchester loaded round, an 8m/m Bergmann-Schmeisser Rimless Grooveless, an 8.5m/m Mars, a .45 Ross, and a set of the three basic BSA Auto pistol cartridges. Now, to collectors, what’s that worth? Maybe a total of 17 or 18 thousand Euros? Well, to anyone insuring ammunition - like airlines, UPS, Fed Ex, etc. that would be 7 cartridges worth about $1.00 each - the average cost of a round of shooting ammunition - so they might, because big cartridges are more expensive, give you ten dollars.

I don’t know the value of what the guys from argentina had with them, I didn’t ask or even what they had brought that was seized. I hope they ended up getting it back. The “what” and “how much” of the situation was none of my business.

To get value back for stolen or lost cartridges, you have to first have taken out a “fine art” separate insurance policy, if you can find anyone who will insure collector cartridges as valuable collector’s items. It is not the most highly recognized collecting field in the world, to say the least.


#9

It seems like just another tactic to demonise law abiding gun and ammunition owners.


#10

Picture 1

Two Federal back labels, the top one showing “Made in W. Germany” with the correct cartridge above it, and the bottom one showing “Made in Austria” with the correct cartridge above it. The headstamps are hard to see on the screen, but if you print them out to full page they are quite legible.

Picture 2

Yugoslav box, probably made for Mexico. Note, though, it is an English-language label. The headstamp, “FC 9mm.P 87” is the Mexican headstamp format used by Industrias Technos made for the Mexican military using the “Fabrica de Cartuchos” FC letters.

Picture 3

Two examples of the “FC”: headstamp made in Mexico by Industrias Technos, on .45 auto rounds. The same style headstamp exists on 9mm Parabellum also, and of Mexican manufacture. Regretably, we do not have any sample of a Mexican military box of the relatively current era, in any caliber, from Industrias Technos. The .45 box is similar to the American .45 Caliber 50-round boxes.

Hope these are of some assistance.

John Moss Collection


#11

The headstamps in my pictures are hard to see. Sorry about that. I should have made them a separate picture. They both say "FC 9MM LUGER). You can get some idea from the way the primer sealant is applied which one is German and which is Austrian if you encounter them. The Geco rounds have a thin application across the whole primer; the Hirtenberg simply a nice bright, dark red ring around the primer. The early American Federals generally didn’t have a primer seal, but later, they started using a red one, but you can tell the Hirtenbergs from those without much trouble.


#12

Thank you very much for the effort to answer my question John .

Glenn