Finds this weekend, what do I have?


#1

8mm Lebel?
Headstamp on the bull cs cart is FA38. Cut down 7.62x63

ETA: Looks like a 8x60r blank, 6.5x55 blank, Galand, wildcat shotshell


#2

Hi Jestertoo,

The 3rd one is a Galand cartridge. See here: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=13814


#3

Is the first one a Kropatschek practice round? The fourth one looks like a .401 WSL shell. What do you think?


#4

The second cartridge is, according to the headstamp, a Swedish 6.5 x 55 mm case, in Sweden originally for the Model 94 Carbine, Model 96 rifle, and Models 96/38 and 38 rifles, along with a machine gun or two. It is a blank cartridge, but with the plain wood bullet, I am not sure if it is Swedish-loaded or not. Norway also uses this caliber, and cases get passed around in Scandanavia.
The headstamp is a bit hard to read on my computer screen, but it appears to be a case from Ammunition Factory Svenska Metallverken (Code “26”). That firm was acquired by Norma some years after WWII, and the headstamp ceased to exist. One of the latest headstamps I have from SM was actually on a 9 mm Para made for Uruguay in 1966, and so dated. The AmF at the top of the headstamp simply stands for “Ammunition Factory” in the Swedish language.


#5

I would add to the previous comments by clarifying that the 8mm Kropatschek is a blank cartridge - here in the UK the term ‘practice’ could imply that its a dummy round which this is not.
The 6.5mm Swedish blank is a ‘Los Patron M/14’ and the lack of bullet colouring identifies it as a machine gun blank. Blanks intended for rifles had their wooden bullets stained red…although I’m sure in practice the two loads were interchangeable.


#6

[quote=“Jim”]I would add to the previous comments by clarifying that the 8mm Kropatschek is a blank cartridge - here in the UK the term ‘practice’ could imply that its a dummy round which this is not.
[/quote]

I hate to be mean to you this early in the day Jim, but I have to disagree with you.

In British/ Commonwealth terminology “Practice” means a live round used for short range or indoor practice. Think .55 inch Boys Practice Marks I and II, .303 inch Practice Tracer P.G. Mark I, Canadian Gallery Practice Ball etc.

A well known incident took place in Northern Ireland some years ago when an 84mm Carl Gustav Practice round was discharged in a classroom when they should have been using a dummy or drill round. Fortunately no-one was hurt but there were some very surprised squaddies!

Regards
TonyE


#7

Jesse, the cartridge shown at right looks like a shot loading made for modified .45 Auto revolvers with reamed out throats. This idea originated from the work done by Lakeville Arms in the 1940’s, which modified .44 S&W Special revolvers for shot loadings using .30-40 cases cut down to 1.575’’ (40 mm). Also, a fire-formed variation for non-modified .45 Auto revolvers was recently discussed (iaaforum.org/forum3/viewtopi … =8&t=15273).


#8

Point taken Tony and you are of course quite right…but that is why I said ‘could imply’ :-)


#9

[quote=“Aaron”]Hi Jestertoo,

The 3rd one is a Galand cartridge. See here: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=13814[/quote]

Cool. Here it is next to what I thought is an inside primed Perrin cartridge. The rims are the same, but the bullets are definitely different.


#10

8x60R Kropatschek? I need to measure the case. That would be cool, don’t have any 8x60r that I know of.


#11