FN Made Yellow Tip 30-06 AP


#1

Hi,

This should be a simple one for the experts, but not for me.

I have the below cartridge with an FN 47 headstamp.

Does anyone know what the yellow color coding means on this cartridge? Also was this cartridge used by the Belgians or is it a contract for another country?

Thanks for any information.

Heavyiron


#2

Belgium made ammo for most anyone who wanted it and made it to specs for whomever ordered it.

I would think that the yellow tip would be an observation round.

just my 2 cents and I am not an expert by any stretch.


#3

According to Chris Punnett in “.30-06” Yellow is the code for Armor Piercing. It is usually found in cases dated “F N 47”. It is believed that these were a contract for the Dominican Republic. The bullet weight is 175 gr.


#4

Since it was for Dominica, it would figure that it would be armor piercing. However, in 7.9 x 57 and I believe also in .303, yellow was used for Observation - basically the same as the German B-patr. (Beobachtungpatrone). So, “Missing Something” was missing something here with his ID, but for good reason. My first thought was it was an observation round, also. Didn’t have time to research it though.

A classic example of why you can’t take any colored tip for granted as to what the round is. All depends on who was using it; that is, who made it or for whom it was made.


#5

It’s AP - I’ve sectioned a bunch of them and they are identical to the drawing shown as Figure 25 in my book.


#6

[quote=“JohnMoss”]Since it was for Dominica, it would figure that it would be armor piercing. However, in 7.9 x 57 and I believe also in .303, yellow was used for Observation - basically the same as the German B-patr. (Beobachtungpatrone). So, “Missing Something” was missing something here with his ID, but for good reason. My first thought was it was an observation round, also. Didn’t have time to research it though.

A classic example of why you can’t take any colored tip for granted as to what the round is. All depends on who was using it; that is, who made it or for whom it was made.[/quote]

I guess I need Chris’s book :D


#7

Missing Something - I have no excuse. I have Chris’ book and I just didn’t go look at it. I was going to answer the question the same way you did, and then thought better of it, since I knew that yellow seals, etc. meant some other things in other countries - Ballistic Standard in England, Proof load in South Africa, Armor Piecercing in Dominica. I used to have the 8mm Mauser version, which was observation, and I may have had a .303 - don’t remember now, as been awhile since I sold that collection.

Admittedly, even though in this case I couldn’t take time to look it up, generally buying a cartridge lets you learn about one cartridge while buying a book on them lets you learn about hundreds. That’s why I have a big library on arms and ammunition. Can’t keep in all in my head - heck, can’t keep much of anything in my head anymore.


#8

Thanks to everyone for the ID on this round.

A large library is definitely an asset when trying to ID color codes.

Heavyiron


#9

Heavyrion,

Absolutely Observing!
Dutch Navy and Marines used this type ammunition with the same HS, CMS and PA in the period 1947 to 1963 in the Garand M1 and Browning Automatic Rifle.
This ammo is combatproven in the period 1947 to 1949 in former Netherlands Indi