Forensic Cartridges-9mmP


#1

At the Czech meeting this past meeting I saw some 9mm loads referred to as “Forensic” cartridges. They were:

  1. Headstamp: “9x10SRA4 DAG09B0851”, Brass bullet with yellow plastic tip Action 4, green pa

  2. Headstamp: “9x19SR MEN09A0502”, GM bullet with black plastic tim, red pa

  3. Headstamp: “9x19SX DAG05B0870”, Tinned (zinc plated) bullet

The note with them was that they had “oxyd galium” “gadolinium” in their powder and/or primer as a forensic signature. I think I understood that the boxes was marked to indicate this.

I suspect these are normal loads for police or other government agencies that contain a forensic marker to clearly indicate which bullets, cases and powder residue were fired by the police. I would not surprised that all of these type loads have these forensic markers, but I cannot recall seeing an indication of this on the boxes.

Can someone explain this process, and confirm that all German police type ammunition has these markers.

Do other countries put these forensic markers in their police ammunition?

Cheers,
Lew


#2

Lew,
The “SINTOX Forensis” logo on the boxes shows that the primer contain Gadolinium as a forensic marker. It is specified by police forces in Germany and Holland (and possibly others) that lead free primers shall contain this marker.
morten


#3

Lew, if it is in use in Germany then it will always depend on single countries as their procurement is all independent.

Here what RUAG is saying about:
ruag.com/en/search?search_no … is&x=0&y=0


#4

Lew, the one made by MEN is designated QD PEP II and contains gallium as a forensic signature (instead of gadolinium). In this cartridge the traceable element is present in the propellant, not in the primer composition.


#5

Lew,
your assumption is correct. The requirement for police-certified ammunition says that it must contain non-volatile chemical elements that are rare in the environment. Its purpose is to be able to tell whether powder-residue is from a police weapon, in case the bullet could not be recovered. (If you have the bullet, you can identify the weapon it was fired from, of course.)
The specification (Technische Richtlinie) for the ammunition runs to 72 pages and I know of no English version.

P.S. I am really sorry I cannot come to Landhorst this year.