Found another Kyber Pass(?) .303 Britt


#1

Pulled a bullet that just did not look right out of the pile of ammo I got from Navy Arms ( see my other post)
And I found that the .303 bullet had been fired and reloaded back into a case where a primer had been replaced. The rim of the cartridge shows that it has seen some very hard use.
The powder charge is that same Russian shotgun powder. After some doing I was able to remove the wad over the powder. It looks to be in Slovak? A list of names? There is a date of 1951. The year I was born,go figure.
Here are a few photo’s of the wad and cartridge:


#2

It’s in Turkish and looks to be, maybe, a page from a medical journal or similar. Jack


#3

Thank you for the info.


#4

Its actually quite hard to recover a .303 bullet in that good condition. They are not that strong and distort badly when fired into anything from which they are likely to be recovered in that part of the world (eg soft earth).


#5

The projectile appears to be a .30 cal. AP bullet. These were common in the reloaded .303 that we saw in the Turkish “floor sweepings”. JH


#6

The case originally had an AP bullet.

The simplest way of telling that the reloaded fired bullet does not belong to a Lee Enfield rifle is that it has a right hand twist. L-Es have a left hand twist!

Regards
TOnyE


#7

[quote=“TonyE”]The case originally had an AP bullet.

The simplest way of telling that the reloaded fired bullet does not belong to a Lee Enfield rifle is that it has a right hand twist. L-Es have a left hand twist!

Regards
TOnyE[/quote]

Tony,

Whilst the left hand twist was the standard for the Lee Enfield rifles, does this also apply to those made under contract in the USA?

gravelbelly