Funny shell


#1

This is a shell developped by Armstrong Withworth & Co in 1915 to use against airships.
Because of the blades the hole is bigger and furthermore it explodes inside the airship
I don’t know if it enter into production.

JP


#2

Why all this effort to make a bigger hole if it explodes inside and “sinks” the whole ship?


#3

The skin of an air ship is not hard enough to make a shell explode.
Therefore because of the blades the hole is bigger

Furthermore if it touchs an hard part inside of the airship (small chance) it explodes.

jp


#4

The diagram makes it looks possible that if the blades are bent backwards upon entering, that they might actuate a fuse for the exploding shell?


#5

Years ago I have found this image in the internet (maybe Russian).


#6

That is AWESOME! Talk about “Special Purpose” ammunition! EOD, that photo is one of the coolest projectiles I have ever seen. I could be mental, but I kinda remember a photo of a different type of “Balloon Killer” projectile in the IAA Journal many months ago???

Jason


#7

Well, on this one the discussion was run if it might be the top of a coat hanger pole but the design in the details is confirming that it is a projectile which was intended to be fired.
The “catches” in the folding arms are wire cutters to my opinion.


#8

I think you all speak of a Ranken dart

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Ranker dart was an air-dropped weapon developed during World War I for the purpose of destroying or damaging German Zeppelins which were attacking Britain at the time. It was an 1 pound explosive missile-shaped flechette-type of bomb which was commonly carried in packs of 24 and could be dropped individually or all at once. Aircraft equipped with Ranken Darts needed to climb above their targets, such as Zeppelins, before dropping them from above. It was put into service in February 1916.

theaerodrome.com/forum/2000/ … darts.html

(a drawing is a few pages into this document)
century-of-flight.net/Aviati … efence.htm


#9

I have seen photos of that Ranken Dart. I believe the Imperial War Museum has a sectioned one on display in its wood transport case?


#10

[quote=“EOD”]Well, on this one the discussion was run if it might be the top of a coat hanger pole but the design in the details is confirming that it is a projectile which was intended to be fired.
The “catches” in the folding arms are wire cutters to my opinion.[/quote]

I think that you are correct about that. I have owned and seen antiballoon shells and none have time fuzes.


#11

[quote=“Pepper”]I think you all speak of a Ranken dart

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Ranker dart was an air-dropped weapon developed during World War I for the purpose of destroying or damaging German Zeppelins which were attacking Britain at the time. It was an 1 pound explosive missile-shaped flechette-type of bomb which was commonly carried in packs of 24 and could be dropped individually or all at once. Aircraft equipped with Ranken Darts needed to climb above their targets, such as Zeppelins, before dropping them from above. It was put into service in February 1916.

theaerodrome.com/forum/2000/ … darts.html

(a drawing is a few pages into this document)
century-of-flight.net/Aviati … efence.htm[/quote]

The Rankin dart is a rare bird. I did a report on these for Woodin Lab a couple of years ago when I sold them my cartridge fired version.

I sent out a couple of copies of it and maybe someone will put it up on the forum.


#12

Here is another anti-balloon projectile also at the Woodin Lab from what I read. I knew my mind was not going crazy when I remembered a photo that Lew Curtis published in the IAA Journal, Issue #454, Mar/Apr 2007.

Jason
PS: I am jealous of everyone who actually knows Mr. Woodin. I have never met him but have heard SO MUCH about him over the years, his work, his lab, his knowledge, and most importantly, his kindness. If I ever get to a show I hope he will be there. :-)

Anyhow, This is a really cool projectile.


#13

Jason - Bill Woodin would appreciate your interest in cartridges but probably as much or more, your good work with animals. He was one of the early forces behind the Sonora Desert Museum, a world famous Zoo that I know needs no introduction to you. Bill is a Herpatologist (forgive me if I mis-spelled that) by profession, and has done huge work on the snakes and other flora and fauna of the Sonora Desert. ou should try some day soon to make a trip out to the Woodin Laboratory. The only thing, he doesn’t collect much over 37 mm.

John Moss


#14

No way! That is amazing! I am very familiar with that museum and some of their staff. I am HUDGE into reptiles. Now I really want to meet him regardless if only collects ammunition under 37mm, haha :-)

Jason


#15

John–I sent Jason the same information in an email. We were writing at the same time. I wasn’t sure if Bill would want his “Non-Cartridge” interests on the Forum, so I choose an email to Jason instead. I am sure Bill won’t mind though.