Fuze or Artillery Identification (US Navy fuze cover)

New Member: Hoping for identification on this conical fuze or shell cover. It is approx. 5.5"h, 4" diameter at base, 2.20lbs, interior with threads at bottom. The base has four protruding tabs likely used to tighten onto or loosen from a shell part. The tip is marked at center HF (the F coming off one side of the H, monogram like). Around the tip are numbers, in this case 161056H. Have three all with the HF but different numbers around the tip. 2021-09-16T05:00:00Z

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RMF,

Welcome to the Forum.

A photo would go long way in helping you with your question.

Brian

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cannon1
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I am probably entirely off, but why do you think it is ammo related? Was it found with ammo or some military documents or anything of provenance?

I was told that it was from a WWII USN practice shell?? However, I have been unable to find any photo confirmation or discover what the stamps at tip mean

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Thanks, may we see the bottom?

Interior now pictured…empty with threads at bottom

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I work with various modern compressors and gas tanks and many of them have these brass caps, smaller versions of what you have, brass or copper is an indication of desire NOT to have sparks generated by steel-to-steel strike. Those 4 tabs are an indication of frequent forceful need to instal/uninstall this cap. Maybe it is a transportation fuse cap? Or from a large archaic steam locomotive? It is old, but the markings don’t look military to me. But I am no expert…The serif on “H” may be another clue…

It’s the fuze cover off a naval projectile, likely off a US 5”. The projectile had threads built into the projectile body just below the fuze and was unscrewed prior to firing.

I cannot ID for sure what this one is off but I would bet on it being a 5” as the covers were short and stubby like this example I found on Google (identical actually it would seem). They come up on eBay for sale fairly often too. image

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Thanks for proving me wrong. I borrowed this from the web. It says WWII 5inch 38 calibre fuse cover.
image

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There’s modern ones that are taller and rounded too that look much more like modern gas canister valve covers so I can see how they could be confused.

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Past postings with photos from website “oldguns.net”-

US NAVY BRASS NOSE CAP FUZE PROTECTOR FOR 5”, 6”’ 8”, AND 16” PROJECTILES - Navy 5” and larger projectiles were issued with the fuzes installed. (The Army usually had lifting plugs in 155mm and larger projectiles to make them easier to handle, and then fuzes of the desired type were installed prior to firing.) Navy projectiles were moved about the ship by hand, then downloaded into the magazines using projectile hoists and stacked in racks, and then subject to shifting around a bit as the ship rolled and pitched at sea, so it was good to protect the fuze from damage in all this. The top of the projectile body had threads cut into it, and these were for a fuze protector, such as this one. Several types were made, with the brass version most common for WW2 and earlier, but later a simple stamped steel type was adopted. The caps were removed before the projectiles were sent up to the gun mount, and later turned in for salvage, or thrown overboard. I have only seen a few of these loose and was fortunate enough to find a couple more. Used on all the 5", 6", 8" and 16" U.S. Navy gun projectiles, and perhaps others as well. Typical example shown… http://oldguns.net/catho.htm
image

U.S. NAVY MARK 4 FUZE CAP FOR 5"/54 PROJECTILES (LATE STEEL TYPE) - Used exclusively with the 5"/54 projectiles with their more slender profile. Stamped steel construction. Typical example shown- type of finish may vary…

U.S. NAVY FUZE CAP FOR PROJECTILES (LATE STEEL TYPE) - This is the late WW2 and post –war style made of stamped steel instead of cast brass, to conserve critical materials. Navy 5” and larger projectiles were issued with the fuzes installed. (The Army usually had lifting plugs in 155mm and larger projectiles to make them easier to handle, and then fuzes of the desired type were installed prior to firing.) Navy projectiles were moved about the ship by hand, then downloaded into the magazines using projectile hoists and stacked in racks, and then subject to shifting around a bit as the ship rolled and pitched at sea, so it was good to protect the fuze from damage in all this. The top of the projectile body had threads cut into it, and these were for a fuze protector, such as this one. Several types were made, with the brass version most common for WW2 and earlier, but later a simple stamped steel type was adopted. The caps were removed before the projectiles were sent up to the gun mount, and later turned in for salvage, or thrown overboard. I have only seen a few of these loose and was fortunate enough to find a couple more. Used on all the 5", 6", 8" and 16" U.S. Navy gun projectiles, and perhaps others as well. Typical example shown- type of finish may vary…

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Thanks to BDGreen, Sksvlad, and Spaceinvader for the I.D. of the
shell USN fuze protector. BDGreen photos prove an exact match.

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I love this Forum. The item isn’t my thing but the expertise and fellowship is awesome!

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Here is a photo of mine on a, US NAVY 5"/38CAL TP round.

Jason



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