German 5-rds. stripper clips


#1
  • A good friend of mine asked me some details about the German made 5-rds. stripper clips (for the 7.92X57 ammo) and unfortunately I was unable to answer him. I would like to see some types of German 5-rds. stripper clips used between 1939-45 and even before that with details about markings, construction, etc. Many thanks in advance for any help, Liviu 03/19/10

#2

To do justice to this subject a lengthy article or book would be required!!
Here are some 1942 and 1945 dated chargers. These dates seem to be the least encountered and are of phosphate coated steel on the ones I have and have seen. The 2 chargers with the red stripes were for identifying those filled with the S.m.K.H. loading. The last ones are just a series of different year markings used by dza during 1944



#3

This is a huge subject with a great variety of makers marks and a few variations in construction.

This is one of the earlier chargers, marked with the ‘I’ of the Munitionsfabrik Spandau. The body is of nickled brass and the steel spring has a little hole at each end that seems to be a feature of early chargers.

These chargers seem to be made largely in brass during peacetime with steel being used when the brass became a strategic material in times of war.

This is a brass bodied charger from the same maker as the first one.

This is a steel bodied charger marked with the ‘J’ of the Hauptlaboratorium Ingolstadt.

After the First World War there were severe restrictions on the production of ammunition in Germany and it’s difficult to place any particular type of charger during this period. This changed in 1929 when a different type of marking was introduced. I’ve no idea who made these but they appear to be made in every year between 1929 and 1934.

After 1933, with the more overt re-armament underway there was a huge increase in the production of chargers with a proliferation of makers marks.

Happy collecting, Peter


#4

[quote=“pbutler”]To do justice to this subject a lengthy article or book would be required!!
Here are some 1942 and 1945 dated chargers. These dates seem to be the least encountered and are of phosphate coated steel on the ones I have and have seen. The 2 chargers with the red stripes were for identifying those filled with the S.m.K.H. loading. The last ones are just a series of different year markings used by dza during 1944


[/quote]

Very interesting. Have you ever seen the B-Patrone packed on clips ?


#5

I haven’t seen a B-Patronen lable that indicates packing in clips (Für Gewehr, I.L., etc.), but maybe there are some out there.
In February 1945, Hitler released the B-Patronen loading for antipersonnel use by snipers and others on the Eastern Front only. It’s possible some of them were packed that way and never made it back to Western Europe.


#6

Liviu: In the years before the First World War and into the early years of the war a clip like the one-piece Turkish clip was used by the German armed forces rather than the better known two-piece version. The Turkish clips are unmarked, of course, but the German ones seem usually to be marked. Jack


#7

Some of the early stripper clips.
From the left iron,iron,brass,copper plated iron.

451kr.


#8
  • Thank you very much for all the great pictures and the interesting information posted already at this topic. I had no idea there is such a large variety of German 5-rds. stripper clips. A complete article or a book about this subject would be great. => I recommended this topic and the IAA forum to my friend who had asked me about the German 5-rds. stripper clips. Thanks again, Liviu 03/21/10

#9

[quote=“451kr”]Some of the early stripper clips.
From the left iron,iron,brass,copper plated iron.

451kr.[/quote]

There exists a version of the one part charger without the central re-inforcing rib. I’ve seen these in pictures but I’ve never had my hands on one. Does anyone know where it fits in the production of this type of charger and does anyone have a spare example!

Happy collecting,

Peter


#10

Unless you find these chargers with cartridges or packaging it is quite difficult to place undated examples within the production life of the design.
There are certain manufacturing details which provide clues though. The earliest seem to be of nickle plated brass but, as with chargers for other calibers, it seems that the very earliest have a ‘square’ section to the channel body. These have very sharp edges compared to later types which are much more rounded. Here is a brass bodied, nickled, square section one marked ‘DM in a cartouche’.

Another indication of the early types is the presence of a pair of small holes in the spring, one at each end. There’s nothing to stop springs being moved from one charger to another so this has to be open to doubt though. Here’s a picture of both types;

Happy collecting, Peter


#11

In November 1904, the “Ladestreifen oF” (clip without spring) was introduced. It was made of brass. The first production was without the re-inforcing rib.

At the start of WW1 it was replaced by steel. The troop at the front complained about this clip. The cartridges did not come of, or were falling of in the dirt. After a short time this clip was replaces by the normal one with a spring.

Dutch


#12

Many of these as well as hundreds of other types of clips are illustrated and described in our publication about the subject. It is the only reference on this subject in print. Chas. Elder , the author , made the study his life’s work. If anyone is interested I will list it on the buy section with a special price for IAA members.


#13

Chargers for 7.9x57 Mauser rifle rifles have been produced in a number of different design variations over the years.

The original type, illustrated above by Phil and Peter, was introduced in 1898 by DWM as their “Ladestreifen 3c” (there seems to be no record of a “3a” or “3b”) and it remained the most commonly found design throughout the hundred years-plus service of the K98 rifle and its derivatives. In addition, Lstr 3c was also specified by DWM for use with the 6.5x58 Portuguese M.08 Mauser-Vergueiro and with the 6,8x60 M.08 Chinese Mauser rifles. It was also used by Germany to hold 7.9 Kurz cartridges for the StG44.

The middle of the three sidewall lugs served for identification purposes only, but several countries, particularly Portugal and post-WW2 Czechoslovakia, deleted it and made chargers for use with K.98-type Mausers with only the two outside lugs. The reason for this change is not clear.

Other main European variants were the German “M.04oF” one-piece type shown by 451kr above, and the 3-piece “spring and platform” charger, based on a Georg Roth design and used during the inter-war years by Czechoslovakia with their Vz24 7.92x57 Mauser rifle. Sufficient Czech ammunition was captured by Germany to warrant its issue to some of their army units, and at least one example of this Czech charger has been found as a battlefield pick-up in Normandy.

Finally, Japan made 7.92 chargers strongly resembling their Arisaka charger in design detail, and China made a range of variants, with one central reinforcing groove in the base instead of the usual two, or with no groove, and another type with a “U-section” spring modelled on that of the US .30-06 charger.

John E