German 7,62cm Pak 36 projectiles (drawings)


#1

Happy collecting, Peter


#2

Hmmm, I have never seen that bi-metal type of driving (rotating) band before, copper on iron. Is this design common?

gravelbelly


#3

I think that this design was used because these were captured Soviet guns which were reworked. The nature of the rifling required this. I am not sure if it was too soft or too shallow. Maybe EOD knows.


#4

These are the “KPS” driving bands. The abbrevioations stands for “Kupfer-Panzer-Stahl”.
It was just a measure to save copper. By making a bimetal strip with the steel side facing inwards (not getting in touch with the bore) about half of the copper could be saved.

This was used as an interim solution (hence the relative scarcity) till the “FES” sintered iron driving bands became standard.


#5

[quote=“EOD”]These are the “KPS” driving bands. The abbrevioations stands for “Kupfer-Panzer-Stahl”.
It was just a measure to save copper. By making a bimetal strip with the steel side facing inwards (not getting in touch with the bore) about half of the copper could be saved.

This was used as an interim solution (hence the relative scarcity) till the “FES” sintered iron driving bands became standard.[/quote]

Do you see them on other calibers ?


#6

It was no question of caliber and never got mentioned in a caliber respect in any German document I have seen so far. Though the larger the caliber the more copper was saved due to the size. I think there were no smaller ones than 75mm since the savings were too little to justify the extra work (like for a 50mm projectile).


#7

I have not seen these except for these reworked Soviet guns.