German 7.9 box labels


#1

This is a label for 7.9x57 German MG ammo made by the Czechs under German occupation. Aside from the bullet jacket plating metal it is the same as any other German MG ammo of this caliber. Why bother with a special designation ?
It seems that anyone who actually cared could tell by the maker code that it was Czech made so why bother with the sS(t) ?

Would it work better in the Czech made guns ?


#2

I know that there are several guys out there that know a heck of a lot more about this than I do. However, I do know that the Germans used letter designations for captured, or occupation produced hardware. We’ve all seen the h (Dutch), r (Russian), p (Polish), i (Italian) on ammo and equipment. Maybe because the took the Czechs by force, they considered them an occupied terriotory?

I’ve never noticed any difference in the firing characteristics of the Czech made 7.92. I’ll reserve comment on that for the guys that own German machineguns and get to fire them a lot.

Dave


#3

It is all written on the label.

It was made with one or more Czech. Components.
Czech. M24 powder.
Czech. Style bullets.

Dutch


#4

[quote=“dutch”]It is all written on the label.

It was made with one or more Czech. Components.
Czech. M24 powder.
Czech. Style bullets.

Dutch[/quote]

Yes that is obvious from the label and from the makers code. My question is; why have a special designation for ammunition if it is the same as other Nazi made ammo except for the jacket material ? Who cares ?


#5

The label mentions projectiles (style, not just jacket material) and propellant not made to German standards - which was not necessarily derogative. In the given situation there was no time to fully compare, test and understand all aspects, and that is why the label gives this information. As a safety measure such classified SAA was then preferably (mandatorily?) not issued to front lines to avoid the risk to understand possible differences there …

Hans


#6

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”][quote=“dutch”]It is all written on the label.

It was made with one or more Czech. Components.
Czech. M24 powder.
Czech. Style bullets.

Dutch[/quote]

Yes that is obvious from the label and from the makers code. My question is; why have a special designation for ammunition if it is the same as other Nazi made ammo except for the jacket material ? Who cares ?[/quote]

It seems, you asked, you care.


#7

Not the point. As I understand the purpose of the information on the German 7.9 label; the components are identified as to manufacture to provide a trace back in case of any problems with any of these components.

Ammunition of this same type was made in other countries under German occupation without any special designation.

The manufacturers code identifies the production of the components in Czech factories with ease for any party who would actually be interested in this information. That being the case why the special sS(T) designation.

Of course this has nothing to do with me ,as all well know, and these kinds of silly personal comments are part of the problem with this forum.


#8

[quote=“dak21”]I know that there are several guys out there that know a heck of a lot more about this than I do. However, I do know that the Germans used letter designations for captured, or occupation produced hardware. We’ve all seen the h (Dutch), r (Russian), p (Polish), i (Italian) on ammo and equipment. Maybe because the took the Czechs by force, they considered them an occupied terriotory?

I’ve never noticed any difference in the firing characteristics of the Czech made 7.92. I’ll reserve comment on that for the guys that own German machineguns and get to fire them a lot.

Dave[/quote]

That “occupied territory” idea might be interesting to pursue. Thanks.


#9

True, and those were composed of components all made to German specifications.

But maybe my wording was not clear, I tried to express further up that the b[/b]s are there in this case because components were not made to German specifications. An example:

Likely they would work with good results, but if LC loaded SAA using someone’s kind-of-like-SS109 projectiles and Russian SF033 propellant - both without STANAG certificate - for the US Army in Afghanistan to cross supply shortages, it would be mentioned on the labels, would it not?

Hans


#10

As was said of chicken soup, “it can’t hurt.” Jack


#11

[quote=“Hans”]The label mentions projectiles (style, not just jacket material) and propellant not made to German standards .

This went over my head the first time but I think that this is the answer. The case and primer designations do not have the T because they were made to German specifications, the powder and bullet were not. It follows that the big " T " after s.S. means ; this ammunition was not made to total German specifications. There are certainly other packets of 7.9 s.S. ammo made at this same arsenal and other Czech arsenals which do not have the “T”. These should have been made to total German specifications or at least they gave up on this type of marking.


#12

True, and those were composed of components all made to German specifications.

But maybe my wording was not clear, I tried to express further up that the b[/b]s are there in this case because components were not made to German specifications. An example:

Likely they would work with good results, but if LC loaded SAA using someone’s kind-of-like-SS109 projectiles and Russian SF033 propellant - both without STANAG certificate - for the US Army in Afghanistan to cross supply shortages, it would be mentioned on the labels, would it not?

Hans[/quote]

I think that this is correct. Thank you.


#13

With pleasure!

Hans