German 7.92mm and the meaning of labels

Hello,
I decided to register to this forum since I’m new in collecting ammo and, even if I read all I can find, I have always few question without answer.

I have now ~30 originals box. Some with labels. I understand the usage of “I. L.” or “In Ladestreifen” and “Lackierte Hülsen” but what about “Für Gewehr” and “Für MG” ?

I don’t want to disassemble some to check the load. They look the same and they can be loaded with brass, CWS and LS.

Someone could tell me more about that ?

Thanks

Welcome here SirN!

“Für Gewehr” means “for rifle”.

“Für MG” means “for machine gun”.

Or is your question about why ist was specified on the boxes?

The “Fur MG” and “Fur Gew” only means that the ammunition is, quality wise, suitable for these types of Guns…NOT that they are a specific Loading. The Overstamp was usually applied later than at the factory, usually at a Depot, after testing (older ammo); There are also overstamps denoting “training only”.

The Labels on German cartridge Packs ( 15 rds Rifle, 16 rds Pistol, 300 Tragegepakt, and 1500 PatronenKasten) are all interesting as to the information supplied.

Doc AV

iL im Ladestriefen ( sp.)

Steel cases are difficult to get right. The label “Für Gewehr” basically means that function firing of this lot showed problems (usually stuck cases in the chamber; Hülsenklemmer in German) in MG34, especially when the barrel was hot. In peacetime conditions it would have been rejected.

On the other hand “Für MG” means that this lot showed no problems during function firing in MG34. It basically told the troops: set aside this lot for use in machine guns, because it works well. Do not waste it by issuing it to rifle carrying soldiers.

A different situation existed for pistol cartridges. P08 had a step in the chamber, which was problematic for steel cases. So steel cased ammunition often was marked for use in submachine guns only (or initially: not for pistols). This does not mean a “hotter” load but simply is a result of steel cases not really being compatible with the step in the P08 chamber.

JPeelen,

I’m not sure it was only ment for steel cases, as there are boxes with brass cases and the “Für Gewehr” stamp

I always tought that it replaced the ‘i.L.’ marking, as my box was loaded on ladestreifen…

[quote=“DocAV”]The “Fur MG” and “Fur Gew” only means that the ammunition is, quality wise, suitable for these types of Guns…NOT that they are a specific Loading. The Overstamp was usually applied later than at the factory, usually at a Depot, after testing (older ammo); There are also overstamps denoting “training only”.

The Labels on German cartridge Packs ( 15 rds Rifle, 16 rds Pistol, 300 Tragegepakt, and 1500 PatronenKasten) are all interesting as to the information supplied.

Doc AV

iL im Ladestriefen ( sp.)[/quote]

Please don’t forget the 20 and 50 rounds boxes.

Rgds

Thanks, Dutch,
I had thought of them, but didn’t include them as they were not germane to the 7,9mm Rifle and 9mm Pistol Ammo( my mistake.). I knew of the 20 rd PP33 Packet, but had not seen the 50 round Pack.

Doc AV

Thanks for your answers.

The question was why is it specified ont the boxes.

So this labels, “Für Gewehr” and “Für MG”, was add after testing packaged ammo. Mainly for steel cases lot, but I have already saw that on box containing brass loaded ammo. Like the one showed here.

But if this labels approve the usage with MG and Gewehr, what about all the other box without any label ?

I am under the impression that “Für Gewehr/Für MG” were no longer used later in the war.

Small arms ammunition was produced by around 30 different factories under German control. Some were experienced, some totally new to this type of product. Personnel changes happened all the time. Conditions became more and more chaotic during the war. Do not expect that all rules were applied in a consistent way by every factory and every military acceptance official.