German 75mm What?


#1

Looks like this fellow is stuffing a potato masher into the 75mm gun. What is he actually doing?


#2

That could possibly be a ‘bore erosion gage’ to determine how much of the rifling origin is eroded away. Erosion fits into the fire control problem when shooting large caliber guns. If I remember correctly, we called ours ‘wye gages’ due to their shape.


#3

Interesting, Thank you. This gun takes a very short case which looks like what is on the end of the handle.


#4

It is a wooden ramrod to load the round. These gun lifted up the hole barrel ass. to load it. After a shell push the extractor the “Breech” close. The machine is always faster than the pain - so better use a ramrod :-).


#5

I see what you mean. Do you have a manual for this gun ?


#6

Yes, as genkideskan says, its a rammer to push in the cartridge case.

It is a leichte Infantrie Geschutz 18. It is a 75mm infantry support gun whose action was a break-open type action, like a shotgun…it was seperately loaded, the projectile rammed in first, then the cartidge case with the proper increments and cardboard closing cup rammed after. When the rim of the case hit the extractors, the action closed automatically.

Very short cases with I believe (not having my references handy) up to seven increments…

Here is a link to a thread showing a complete ammo set up I have on another forum…

bocn.co.uk/vbforum/threads/7 … post165357


#7

[quote=“pzjgr”]Yes, as genkideskan says, its a rammer to push in the cartridge case.

It is a leichte Infantrie Geschutz 18. It is a 75mm infantry support gun whose action was a break-open type action, like a shotgun…it was seperately loaded, the projectile rammed in first, then the cartidge case with the proper increments and cardboard closing cup rammed after. When the rim of the case hit the extractors, the action closed automatically.

Very short cases with I believe (not having my references handy) up to seven increments…

Here is a link to a thread showing a complete ammo set up I have on another forum…

bocn.co.uk/vbforum/threads/7 … post165357[/quote]

Thanks but the pictures don’t open.

This gun and the "88"s are the most common in photos of German artillery from the 30s and 40s.

I have never seen the push rod before. Is it issue ?


#8

It is listed in many gun manuals as assessory - not only in Germany - the US and English used them too. Mostly with the non fixed ammo. 25 pdr ect.
Have a look at movies showing firing and loading guns. Fixed ammo was simply “thrown” in - hands far away from the snapping breech.


#9

The big guns which have component loads always has large ramming rods for this purpose. This little one looks strange to me as it is being used. This 75mm was a good gun and widely used. I think that I bought a copy of the manual earlier but can’t find it.


#10

On a 3"/50, the extractors hold the breech block in the down/open position. We had a tool made out of the base of a 3" case with a handle on it. We used it to trip the extractors to close the breechblock.


#11

Did that close on a live round or an empty chamber.


#12

When a live round is chambered on a 3"/50 Mk 33 MOD 13, it is catapulted(sp?) at high speed. The rim of the case slams into the extractors, releasing the breech block. When closing the breech on an empty chamber, I recall operating a lever on the left side of the gun before tripping the extractors with the homemade tool.