German ammunition label WW2


#1

Anyone know this one ?


#2

CAN ANYONE ID THIS LABEL ?


#3

Its a box of fuzes from ‘cxl’ (an unknown maker) containing 2000 units in 80 cardboard boxes each holding 25 units.

Maybe someone else can flesh out the details.

Peter


#4

According to "Liste der Fertigungskennzeichen für Waffen, Munition und Gerät, published in March 1941 by the Chef der Heeresrüng und Befehlshaber des Ersatzheeres, Oberkommando des Heeres, the code “cxl” indicates a product of Rachmann Metallwerke Jnh., Wilhelm Rachmann, Haida/Sud. I know nothing about the item itself.


#5

Thank you. I am surprised that the numerous collectors of German ammo do not know this.


#6

The problem is the “AZ für Füllkörper” it makes no sense to all what I know so far. The packing size given fits 20mm fuzes.

To elaborate on the manufacturers here or taking the “AZ” only for the fuze designation does not help in ID.


#7

“AZ fur FullKorper” basically AZ is A? Zundung ( Fuse) to be filled ( ie empty fuse bodies). FullKorper (with umlauts) means “packing”.

The lower line is about not fitting/firing them ( as they are empty).

The Box label was for large Crates of Cartons of fuze bodies on their way from the Fuze Body manufacturer to the Filling factory…to be filled with fuzing compound, and the fitted ( probably in another factory) to shells…probably 20mm (Aircraft/Anti-aircraft shells)
The date is in May,1945, so pretty late in the war. ( well, Too late…war in Europe ended 8 May. So that’s why the label has survived…

Nice item of the chain of manufacture not often seen in ammo collecting.

regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#8

Docav,

it was assumed here the AZ stood for Aufschlagszünder. Füllkörper stands for something meant to be filled. Maybe in this context Füllkörper is better translated as carrier element or envelope.

Remember, in Germany the date format is different from the Anglo-Saxon format. It reads 5th of January, still pretty flate in the war.

Hans


#9

Thank you all for sorting out this rare label.


#10

[quote=“enfield56”]Its a box of fuzes from ‘cxl’ (an unknown maker) containing 2000 units in 80 cardboard boxes each holding 25 units.

Maybe someone else can flesh out the details.

Peter[/quote]
cxl = Rachmann Metallwerke
Jnh.
Wilhelm Rachmann,
Haida / Sud.


#11

Very deep. Thank you.


#12

Rachmann was in what today is known as the czech republic. Maybe, and it is just a suggestion, their german was not “Reichsstandard” and the word Füllkörper was meant to be something else. Was any of the many Wurfkörper types delivered empty to be filled at the depot?
Soren


#13

[quote=“Hans”]Docav,

it was assumed here the AZ stood for Aufschlagszünder. Füllkörper stands for something meant to be filled. Maybe in this context Füllkörper is better translated as carrier element or envelope.

Remember, in Germany the date format is different from the Anglo-Saxon format. It reads 5th of January, still pretty flate in the war.

Hans[/quote]

Hans let me go somewhat further on this.
“Füllkörper” in German ammunition terms stands for an item representing some sort of filler in a preset form (cube, cylinder or what ever shape). Means here it is the item filling up some space rather than a case or container of any sort which has to be filled. So here it might be a pressed explosive charge or if not specified in material even an inert spacer which is acting as a “filling body” what brings us to a direct (not allways correct) translation of the term “Füllkörper”.
Hence the to my opinion cranky wording “AZ for Füllkörper”.
So it basically says “impact fuze for a pre shaped filler”. As said the size and packing is in accordance to 20mm fuzes but why should one describe it so complicated (and never observed that before on hundreds if not thousands of related items in German ordnance).
Maybe the late date of January 1945 and a possible clandestine designation (such has been observed before on secret German items) may be the reason for this designation.
Speculation does not help though. Als usual we are lacking the documents or the real items this label was meant for.


#14

Danke, Alex,

I did not mean to speculate on the item - I have no expertise in this particular field of ammo -, my intention was to help interpret what could have been meant. Tricks of German language, body to fill with and not body to be filled. There is always something new.

:-))

Hans


#15

Sorry about the date Misinterpretation, I read it as “5-4-45” I forgot that the Script “1” in German is almost like an upside down “V”, and the dirt obscured it as well. Nothing to do with American vs European Dating order.

Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#16

Can anyone agree on the date ?


#17

Date here is 5th January of 1945.


#18

Thank you.

As understand this the label is from a box of unloaded fuzes bodies which are on the way to be loaded. Correct ?

This is from a large wooden crate and I assume most of these were burned for heat and cooking during 1945 and later.


#19

More to consider;

It does not seen that the box would have to be air tight for unloaded fuzes. Could these be partially loaded fuzes heading for something more ?


#20

The box here is a standardized item which was used for many types of ordnance. The only thing indicating the content was/is the label.