German ammunition?


#21

Some of the German Navy ammo is quite colorfull but rare in the US. German artillery ammo through WW1 was nicely painted as well. They dropped most of this in favor of lettering stenciled. This was due in large part to their soldiers being able to read. In WW1 and prior many soldiers from most countries could not read and so the color codes were needed.

The private school which my children attended made a great deal of money teaching US soldiers how to read. I am sure that many others did as well.

To my knowledge the British and the Italians had the most colorfull artillery ammo of WW2.

Today, some of the French ammo is extremely colorfull.

Here is a small look at some of the British color from one of our publications.


#22

[quote=“pzjgr”]Ok, one more try here…could they possibly be Italian, mainly the 190MM APHE-base fuzed projectile, or possibly the 149mm/35 APC-HE-projectile mod. 32-38?

Its hard to judge the diameter…[/quote]

It took a good eye to ID what shells these were. Congratulations !


#23

Thank you to DrSchmittCSAEOD for posting this thread.

Likely none of us will ever duplicate his amazing knowledge on the subject, or his unbelievable collection, but it is wonderful to see and learn what he shares.

Keep it up!


#24

Italian 149mm Howitzer.
Separate Charge shell.

DocAV
AV Ballistics.


#25

Yes, there are plenty of the 149mms in this pile as well as other calibers.

As I understand it the Australians captured large stores of Italian ordnance and thousands of prisoners in N.Africa. Is Italian artillery ammo rare in Australia ?


#26

[quote=“JohnS”]Thank you to DrSchmittCSAEOD for posting this thread.

Likely none of us will ever duplicate his amazing knowledge on the subject, or his unbelievable collection, but it is wonderful to see and learn what he shares.

Keep it up![/quote]

“Praise from Ceasar”

Very kind, thank you.

I did have a couple of hands up as my family collection was started in about 1849 by Ralph Crittenden ( Crittenden and Tibbals , S. Coventry Ct.).

My Uncle , the late Raymond Crittenden of LaGrange Ohio and Scottsdale Az. , started teaching me about this when I was a boy.

Ohio in the 40s,50s,60s was a great place to collect. White and Munhall was there ,before they moved to Bel Air Md., as was Charlie Yust , Col. Walt Kramer (Frankford Arsenal ordnance officer) , Neal Mulgary and plenty of other SERIOUS students of the subject.

Walt had the most exotic experimental ammo such as the Gerlichs in 50 cal and far too many others to mention. He always told me to buy him out and that I would regret not doing it in the future. He was right.

As a young “know it all” I had no idea how rare his collection was. I KNOW NOW !

He is long gone.


#27

[quote=“DrSchmittCSAEOD”]

I do not know who EK is but he(or she,who knows) takes some good photos.[/quote]

Erhard Koch, he is a German living in the US.

Here his website:

munitionstech.com/


#28

Thank you. I thought that he was back in Germany.


#29

No, he is a US citizen now.


#30

Here is some German WW2 color - a leaflet shell

and some WW1 gas shells repainted to original colors


#31

Here are some italian gas shells

green cross is Lost - red cross is Chlorpikrin - the red shell with white cross is Phosgen

.


#32

Nice color shots. Thank you. Where are these ?


#33

Here in Germany - Munster


#34

Do you think that the museum there would want my artillery wall charts ?


#35

It is a governmental chemical weapons disposal facility.