German/Czech "C-mpu-44" and "C-mpu-45" chargers

Just came back from an Allentown,PA gun show. The 1st show of 2021!!! You’d not believe the prices!!! And crowds!!! Congrats, everyone, the value of your ammo collections (if brand new) just tripled!!
I found these, which appear to be 1948 Yugo boxes with old German chargers re-purposed. Am I right? These are authentic 1944 chargers?

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The cartridges are Czechslovakian. What makes you think the box is Yugo? I am asking because Hungary also used these cartridges in similar 15rd boxes in that era.

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Yes, it seems these are chargers made by Wlaschimer Maschinenfabrik GmbH. Prag, Werk Wlaschim, 1944. The C means that thinner sheet steel was used. And these are Czecheslovakian cartridges. So the chargers were probably left overs. And what about the boxes? They look at least like the German model. Can you find some stamps, imprints in the cardboard? Left overs too?

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Sorry, guys, my mistake. I had to take my daughter’s dog to a vet. Had no time to think, just guessed incorrectly. Yes, Czech it is. I don’t see anything on the boxes.

Given that Wlaschimer Maschinenfabrik GmbH were located in Prague, albeit occupied at the time, these might be said to be Czech chargers too … at least de jure, if not de facto.

It’s remarkable how ell these have survived the intervening 77 years.

Pete

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Wlaschim is the German name of Vlasim [it should have a Hacek above the s]. Therefore “mpu” was a company located in the same town as the Sellier & Bellot factory.

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Here is the label of the Czech made box for Hungary

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Vince, this is a most interesting label. Do you know the headstamps?
And what is the Hungarian text in the 3rd line?

Some had “C-mpu-45” on them. Czechoslovakia was one of the last battlefield fighting places in Europe. Amasing how they kept on working with things literally collapsing around them!!!

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Vlad there is reports about factories which were still working when Russian artillery fire was audible.
Shells were delivered to combat troops right from the factory gate with wet paint on them - or no paint at all.

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Ah, now there’s a real find … any 1945 dated charger is a rarity as I know only of 6 different manufacturers and most of the production went East to be lost in the maelstrom. The hardest to find are those dated 1945 followed by those from 1942 when I know of only 3 producers.

It might only be a bit of folded steel … but congratulations !!

Pete

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Alex,
“éles töltény” literally means live cartridge, here used as ball ammunition.
I don’t have an actual specimen at hand but i recall PS 49. I’m not sure though, so I will ask around.

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Vice, any additional info will be great!

Hello friends, i wish all only best to new yer 2021.
chargers and packings from WWII for cartridges 7,92x57 was used in Czechoslovakia any farther to 50. yers (Sellier & Bellot and Považske Strojirny) . Than stock ran out.
I send foto.
New chargers and packings was produced according model 47 (1947)
Regards
Franta

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The earliest date for an identifiable Czech made charger I have is 1949, on both “diamond” and “triangle” marked ones … is there any way to tell that the dark, unmarked one is Czech … and do you have a spare one !!

Pete

Guaranteed only by dimensions and compare with drawing. yes, I have one more
Franta.

The line 15 drb on the carton stands for Darabok (pieces) in Hungarian.

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The first word in “éles töltény” has several meanings. Is it possible it means “sharp” like “Spitzer” in German?

No. Although it translates also into sharp (like a blade), pointed is “hegyes” in Hungarian. See the large “H” printed in the receiver of the converted 8x56R Mannlicher rifles. I’m quite sure the term “éles töltény” was created by translating the German (as Hungrary was part of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy) “scharfe patrone” term, but it is archaic now and not in use in this form anymore.

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Nice article and pictures!
I fail to see how this ammo show, the first in 2021, defines that the value of anyone’s ammo collection has tripled? This type of ammo, if it is reflective of the comment made, has been made by the Zillions and so have the chargers. The fact that it is hard to find here in the U.S. does not make it rare by any stretch of the imagination. If you consider that one charger is made for every 5 rounds of 7.92mm ammo, you still wind up with a Zillion. One respected and well known clip collector once wrote to me that in 1945, the Germans produced more ammunition than ever before – the problem was the DISTRIBUTION OF THAT AMMO! I’m willing to bet anyone a dollar to a donut that somewhere in the former Eastern Block there sits 20 train-car loads of that ammo somewhere yet to be discovered! I would agree with the term Hard to Find, but not rare! Clip and chargers prior to about 1900 are just about rare, because hey were not made by the Zillions! We need to take things in perspective. By the way, I have been trying to sell ammo, like shown, for about 10 years at gun and ammo show – guess what – no one wants it. I have several of these chargers dated 1943-45 – they are not RARE!!!

Respectfully, Claus Marzen, IAA member.

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