German "D.M." charger with "D.M.1896 K." ammo

This charger has 2 round lateral holes in the spring. What is holes’ purpose? (I probably asked this before…) Is this charger original to the ammo?
Also, I found this great topic by Schneider (RIP) 7 x 57 mm Mauser: the 1893 DMK spanish contract, in which he states that in the book “Lessons on chemistry and military industry, explained at the Higher War School by Leoncio Mas Zaldúa, Lt Col, Artillery. Second edition. Tome III, manufacture of war materiel. Madrid, 1900” it says that Spaniads have found many deficiencies. Schneider says “It is funny to read that the chargers were the most difficult item to make, as they had the greater number of rejects upon inspection.” about DM plant in Karlsruhe.
Anyone has a digital copy of this book?
Some of the attached images are gone. Maybe somebody can restore them?


Fixed.

2 Likes

There’s been a few ideas batted about over the years, but nothing conclusively, on why some of these early Mauser pattern type chargers have holes in the springs. I suspect that they’re for indexing to ensure the shearing of the shape is accurate, the spring performs an essential function in the charger, of providing the pressure to retain the cartridges and to make the effort required to strip the cartridges into the magazine equal over the number of cartridges.

This is only conjecture as I’ve never seen documentary evidence that might provide a conclusion. The holes are only seen on very early production chargers and not just on 7x57 ones or on chargers produced by “DM”;


7,9x57

7,65x53

0,425 Westley Richards

7,63x25

Pete

1 Like

I thought I’d go back to the original patent for Mauser’s “improved cartridge holder” to see if there’s an explanation for the holes in the spring, but they’re not mentioned at all, either in the text or the drawings. The British Patent No 7451 dates from 1894.

Pete

1 Like

An example of DWM stripper clip manufacturing.

2 Likes

Looking through my “virtual” collection of chargers it becomes plain that a lot of early 7x57 production ones from different countries feature the holes in the spring, here’s a Spanish one from Toledo;

I also have early “square section” or small spring tab ones from Palencia in Spain, “CK” in Serbia, “LDP” in France, King’s Norton in the UK as well as a couple of unmarked examples … so whatever function they perform, the holes were widely recognised as being necessary in the early years of the Mauser pattern charger.

Pete

1 Like

But later the holes go away. Which points to your theory of “indexing”. I can easily picture a mould with 2 spokes which hold the spring firmly before 2 tabs are shear punched half the way out. Just my imagination, I have no idea about machinery on which the spring is manufactured. But there was an advance in this manufacturing step, maybe a clamp of some kind, which did not necessitate those 2 holes.