German ".G.C.D. . 38 S&W. SP'L."

What is “G.C.D”? That’s a lot of dots in one headstamp,
scan0084

G C Dornheim pre W W II

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Thanks. I found this discussion about the name GECADO Tradename date?

Thanks Vlad.Maybe someone can post a picture of the box these ctgs came in.-

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I’d love to see a box. It probably indicates if it is a German export,and maybe the age too.

Heerman Goering carried a 38 Spl S&W as his sidearm.

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I’d love to see his ammo too!!!

In my view this is not correct. The footage showing Göring’s arrest also shows Allied personnel examining the revolver he carried, and from the proportions it in my opinion clearly was a .45 ACP Smith & Wesson M1917 from his WW1 time.
By the way, Ernst Udet had a revolver of the same model and used it to shoot himself when he realized that he had been a total failure as head of German air armament.

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Peelen - I’m sorry, but your identification of the revolver in question was incorrect. It was a Smith and Wesson Military & Police Model, .38 Special, 4" barrel, blued steel with checkered factory wood grips with S&W Medallion at the top. It was a standard product in every way - no special order features.

Today, the gun is in the U.S. Military Academy Museum at West Point, New York, along with Göring’s Field Marshall’s Baton, which was surrendered at the same time. The holster is also in the display, a quasi-military flap style holster, with maker unknown to me.

The revolver was made in 1934, and evidently was purchased by Göring in Hamburg not long after that.

This may be one of most well-documented S&W Revolvers made.

Edited to remove a grammatically incorrect word.

John Moss

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There is a good write up on the S&W site which agrees with JM’s above comment.
Surprising that a bling enthusiast like HG would carry such a plain jane arm but then again he was informed about firearms.

I’ve always assumed Heinrich had the Smith at this time because he felt it would play well with the more malleable of his captors; a Krieghoff Luger would have been no big deal. He was good at that kind of work I believe. Jack

I don’t think Göring’s surrender to the allies had much to do with the revolver he was carrying. He had it for a long time before that occasion, and if he wasn’t fond of it, he would likely not have purchased it. I have seen several pictures of him wearing the holster for the revolver, well-known due to its inclusion in the display at West Point Museum. The latest was just two days ago, which showed him at the Train Station with Hitler, greeting the arrival of Benito Mussolini not long after the attempted assassination by Col. Klaus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg, at the Wolf’s Lair.

It is clear that he wore that S&W Revolver fairly often.

John Moss

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