German post-WWI date codes


#1

The subject of German post-WWI date codes has come up a few times recently. Here are the letters used and the years represented:

A - 1925
Z – 1926
M – 1927
T – 1928
R – 1929
B – 1930
E – 1931
O – 1932
N – 1933
K – 1934
G - 1935


#2

Phil, thanks a lot!


#3

Phil,

Thank you for posting that. A helpful piece of the puzzle I find German ammunition to be!

Dave


#4

Here are some examples of Year Codes as they appear on German 7.9mm box labels.

It seems strange to me that some of the entries used the code letter while others did not!



#5

Phil: Very interesting labels. I notice the “nachgeglueht” on your second example, meaning (at a guess) “reannealed.” Does this signify reloaded or something more obscure? Thanks much! Jack


#6

Jack - Some cases with 1926/27/28 headstamps were re-annealed to correct a problem with them. When the process was completed a X was struck on the head to indicate the re-annealing had been done. Some of the X’s give the appearance of the earlier WWI 4-segment headstamps but depending on how the cases entered the stamping apparatus the X’s can be found in any position over the original headstamp.

Another identifying feature is the stain left from the re-annealing process. It was not polished off as in the case of normal production and gives the case neck and shoulder a dark appeance.



#7

Phil: Thanks for the clear explanation. What a curious business! Jack


#8

Phil,

While I have not studied much of the new published material on the 7.9 x 57, due to a shift of interests, that is the first cogent explanation of the “X” on those Polte headstamps that I have ever seen. Thanks for posting it, my friend.


#9

PHIL,
The X in the headstamp means that these early sS cartridges received from 1926 a cannelured bullet
for using in the MG.Therefore they add the 4 stripes in the headstamp. After 1928 all the sS bullets produced with
cannalure.

451kr.


#10

451kr - The question that was asked was about the purpose of the overprint “nachgeglüht” (re-annealled). The fact remains that all the 1926/1927 dated cartridges with the “X” stamped on the head that I have seen show the telltale signs of having been re-annealed. The overstamp appears on several known box labels along with the component notation “Geschoss mit rille (bullet with cannelure)”

A more accurate description might be s.S. cartridge with bullet cannelure and re-annealed case.

Note that the [color=#FF0000]case[/color] is called S X P18L26 on the label shown.

[


#11

Phil and 451 - could it be that they go hand in hand - that is, that the necks had to be reannealed so that they could be properly crimped into the cannelured bullet? Just a thought.
I certainly didn’t know the reason at all before this!


#12

O.K. I finally found my mislaid book “Von der Patronen 88 zur Patronen S“ that has all the answers. I was purposely vague concerning the reason for the need to re-anneal the 1926/1927 cases because I couldn’t remember what the reason was.

Here is what the authorities have to say:

[i]Problems with split cases after the change to alloy 72/28 had been solved by 1928 by determining the optimum annealing process. Stored cases had to be re-annealed before loading”.

“The gilding metal plated steel jacketed and cannelured S bullet remained standard without change of its identification of a black primer annulus. As bullets without cannelure had been cancelled, the segmental lines were omitted. Beginning in 1930 the S bullet was replaced by the ballistically superior sS bullet as the common bullet for the rifle and machine gun. It was identified by a green primer annulus and the slender outline.”

“After 1926/1927 manufacture with cannelure, stocks of these were loaded 1930-1931 in stockpiled case of 1926-1927 without segmental line in the headstamp. These had to be subsequently stamped with segment lines. After 1928, bullets were exclusively cannelured, and the lines abandoned.” [/i]

So, the way I read it is the rounds loaded with the cannelured sS bullets in the 1926/1927 cases stamped with the segment lines would also have been re-annealed.

Sorry for any confusion I may have caused.


#13

[quote=“451kr”]PHIL,
The X in the headstamp means that these early sS cartridges received from 1926 a cannelured bullet
for using in the MG.Therefore they add the 4 stripes in the headstamp. After 1928 all the sS bullets produced with
cannalure.

451kr.[/quote]

And what is the meaning of this “X” from 1924.


#14

Dutch,

Could it be that the cartridges from your box has also
have the cannalured bullets??

451kr,


#15

Almost all German cartridges after WW1 have cannalured bullets.

But I can give you an other example.

This is a new Platzpatrone 27. That means, not a reloaded one. It never had any primer stacks.


Dutch