German sentence to translate (1)


#1

could someone translate this sentence?
thanks
jp


#2

Jean-Pierre,
difficult to read, I believe it is only a fragment of a sentence. Maybe not very helpful, but something to start from:
Randhöhe und den Menschen” what comes between the brackets is unreadable to me. except for the date in the end "29.7.90"
Randhöhe = either the hight of the rim (rrim of a bowl for example, or the rim of a ctg) or possibly better: rim mountain range
und den Menschen = and the people

Hans


#3

[quote=“Hans”]Jean-Pierre,
difficult to read, I believe it is only a fragment of a sentence. Maybe not very helpful, but something to start from:
Randhöhe und den Menschen” what comes between the brackets is unreadable to me. except for the date in the end "29.7.90"
Randhöhe = either the hight of the rim (rrim of a bowl for example, or the rim of a ctg) or possibly better: rim mountain range
und den Menschen = and the people

Hans[/quote]

Hans, this is wrongly translated…
The Text is in old german Sütterlin-writings, and says:
“Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren (lt.Ang. unreadable w…G.Pauch 29.7.20)”
“Lt” in this case means in german: laut/ gemaess…Further its not 100% for sure for the last digit of the date, it maybe also a 1 (1921). I have changed colors and shades many times, but this is the closest picture i got out to read the text…
and it means in english:

Rimthickness (Height) after the old Gauges ( by Worker -i do not knew the exact english term for “Angestellter” named G.Pauch and the date 29.7.20…which goes also by the used Sütterlin Writing more close, than the 29.7.1990

Peter


#4

[quote=“Forensic”][quote=“Hans”]Jean-Pierre,
difficult to read, I believe it is only a fragment of a sentence. Maybe not very helpful, but something to start from:
Randhöhe und den Menschen” what comes between the brackets is unreadable to me. except for the date in the end "29.7.90"
Randhöhe = either the hight of the rim (rrim of a bowl for example, or the rim of a ctg) or possibly better: rim mountain range
und den Menschen = and the people

Hans[/quote]

Hans, this is wrongly translated…
The Text is in old german Sütterlin-writings, and says:
“Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren (lt.Ang. unreadable w…G.Pauch 29.7.20)”
“Lt” in this case means in german: laut/ gemaess…Further its not 100% for sure for the last digit of the date, it maybe also a 1 (1921). I have changed colors and shades many times, but this is the closest picture i got out to read the text…
and it means in english:

Rimthickness (Height) after the old Gauges ( by Worker -i do not knew the exact english term for “Angestellter” named G.Pauch and the date 29.7.20…which goes also by the used Sütterlin Writing more close, than the 29.7.1990

Peter[/quote]

Thanks to you both!!!
thanks a lot

I cheked on internet and on Wikipedia they say that Sutterlin writting started to be used in Prusse in 1915 and in Germany in 1920.

  1. Could you confirm that ???

  2. What does mean for you: rim thickness after the old gauges ??

  3. Is this also Sutterlin writting ??

    thanks
    JP


#5

Forensic, I know this is Sütterlin, that’s about all I can take from my screen. Glad you are better set up and I agree I can read this now too. “Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren”, isn’t that in the sense of “rim thickness in the old/obsolete dimensions”? Meaning for example “in the old inches instead of the contemporary mm”?

Hans


#6

[quote=“Hans”]Forensic, I know this is Sütterlin, that’s about all I can take from my screen. Glad you are better set up and I agree I can read this now too. “Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren”, isn’t that in the sense of “rim thickness in the old/obsolete dimensions”? Meaning for example “in the old inches instead of the contemporary mm”?

Hans[/quote]

Hello Hans,
the difference of dimensions is not related to inches or mm but to the thickness of the rim which changes because a different standard.

Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren" could mean
"rim thickness of the old standard" (gemass) (meaning here are the dimensions in the old standard)
"rim thickness after the old standard " (zeitlich) (meaning here are the dimensions in the new standard)

Which one is the good one?

Thanks
JP


#7

As Peter already said, the technical translation of a “Lehre” is a “gauge”.
So in this case I would translate “Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren” as

Rim thickness according to (or using ) the old gauges

rgds
René


#8

I have a different but related question. Wikipedia says that “The Nazi Party banned all “broken” blackletter typefaces in 1941, including Sütterlin, erroneously claiming them to be Jewish”. Is this why Fraktur disappeared from ammunition boxes during the war?


#9

[quote=“FlyingDutchman”]As Peter already said, the technical translation of a “Lehre” is a “gauge”.
So in this case I would translate “Randhöhe nach den alten Lehren” as

Rim thickness according to (or using ) the old gauges

rgds
René[/quote]

Hello R

ené
i perfectly understood what peter said
I didn’t use the name “gauge” but “standard” because it can be misunderstood as “caliber”.

My question was about the meaning of “nach”
“nach” like "according to"
or “nach” like “after” ??

Thanks
JP


#10

[quote=“jeanpierre”]
Hello René

i perfectly understood what peter said
I didn’t use the name “gauge” but “standard” because it can be misunderstood as “caliber”.

My question was about the meaning of “nach”
[color=#FF0000]“nach” like “according to”[/color]
or “nach” like “after” ??

Thanks
JP[/quote]

I would take that one

René