Gun show spoils


#1

Went to a pretty lousy show today but did find a few odds and ends in “junk boxes.” I’m curious about the items in this picture. I actually bought the primers with the intent on using them but then I learned they are likely corrosive and might be collectible. I am curious to learn more about these items. Thanks folks!


#2

The FA 70 primer is corrosive, of the Thiocyanate-Chlorate type. It was originally developed by Winchester, but later adopted by the military. The gallery cartridges had a 140 grain lead bullet at a low MV, the purpose being to allow their use on ranges inadequate for full-power service loads. I don’t think they are too unusual, but a full sealed box would be a nice find. I think the others are .30-40 and .30-'06 wooden bullet blanks. I know nothing about flare cartridges, am sure others do.


#3

The 30-40 and Cal .30 blanks are actually paper bulleted. The Cal .30 Blanks appear to be both a M1903 and a M1906.

The #26 Primer was the last of the corrosive primers used by F.A. The boxes very definitely are collectable.


#4

The flare shell is probably for a 25mm pistol & ought to have a date printed on it. It also should be color coded, probably on the topwad to let you know the flare color & the parachute was to let it give maximum light / burn duration. Probably a white flare but other colors were made.


#5

Thanks, any idea of a date on these? I like the wooden tray inside.

Yes, really neat. The box is not sealed and is missing 3 rounds. The label on the top says Loaded Nov. 1 1920. I think these may be the oldest ammo I have, at least as far as I know. Are these 30-06? I would like to fire one round.

I would like to learn more about the paper bullets. They must be coated in something because close inspection of one shows some small cracks in the surface. Any info on dates?

Good to know! Do you know if these large rifle size?

RED! :)

Thanks folks!


#6

The gallery load is a .30/06… so you could fire it in your 30/06 rifle. Ray or others will be extremely more precise about the exact model of this cartridge


#7

[quote=“Revolver”]Yes, really neat. The box is not sealed and is missing 3 rounds. The label on the top says Loaded Nov. 1 1920. I think these may be the oldest ammo I have, at least as far as I know. Are these 30-06? I would like to fire one round.

[color=#FF0000]Yes, these are 30-06 cartridges. Not sure why you want to fire one. It is just a lead bullet flying at low velocity. The primer is corrosive.
It is cheaper to reload a new 30-06 case with a lead bullet and new primer/powder
[/color]

I would like to learn more about the paper bullets. They must be coated in something because close inspection of one shows some small cracks in the surface. Any info on dates?

[color=#FF0000]The dates on the 30-06 cartridges will tell you the original production date of the case.
The paper blanks were made of used cases, so without a box, an exact date is impossible.
[/color]

[/quote]

cheers
René


#8

First, let me insert my usual nit-pick. The cartridges are Cal .30, or if it helps, Cal .30 (30-06) and Cal .30 (30-40).

The #26 primers were last used in the 7.62MM and Cal .30 International Match ammunition in 1956. The wood tray is typical of primer packaging in the 1950s.

Not much mystery about the Gallery Practice cartridges. They are the M1919 as indicated on the carton label. They were loaded with un-crimped primers in second class cases and were intended to be reloaded in the field. Mixed headstamp dates are common.

The paper bullets are hollow. They were formed by rolling and pressing in a die, and waterproofing. That is the cause of the surface finish. Paper-bullet blanks were phased out around 1910.

Ray


#9

For the .30-40 Krag cartridge, paper bullet blanks were last made by Frankford Arsenal, as Ray says, around 1910. All of the commercial ammunition makers produced them, and those that still existed in the 1950’s were still making them then. Remington-UMC made millions of them for training purposes in 1917 and 1918.

Randy