Help identifying 13.2 x 99

I have a 13.2 x 99 with no head stamp that i am trying to identify.
It has a red annular ring on the primer and a magnetic bullet with 3 - crimps in the neck.
Can anyone tell me where it was made and who it was made for?
Any information will be appreciated.
Thanks, Bob

Bob,

If possible could you provide cartridge profile and case head photos.

Brian

I’M sorry I have no idea how to post the photos I have.
I will see if I can get my son to come over tomorrow and post them for me.
Thanks, Bob

Bob,

Perhaps you will find the following helpful.

Brian

With no headstamp, my first guess would be Japanese, but more info really is needed.

1 Like

Sorry about the quality of the photos but maybe this will be enough to help
Thanks again, Bob.

Japanese Army 13.2x99 for Army Aircraft Cannon
Round primer seal ring and total absence of headstamp is the give-away.
There should be a Kana Inspectors Mark somewhere on the base of the ctg. Very light and small…may be mistaken for a scratch.

Doc AV

bdgreen, jonnyc and DocAV4901 Thank you for the information.
I see some small scratches on the base but can not make anything out.
What would the Kana inspectors mark look like?
Bob

also is this a tracer round?
Bob

According to “Japanese Ammunition 1880-1945” Part 1 book by Ken Elks, Page 87 a Red primer annulus Color is the designation for a Tracer projectile.
also on page 59 for the 7.7 Heavy Machine gun cartridge with a green primer annulus Color is the designation for a Tracer projectile, so I guess the r primer annulus color designation varies in meaning by caliber with Japanese cartridges

Dave
Thanks for the additional information.
Bob

Japanese examples of late manufacture are found without any markings. I’ve never heard of one of them having inspector marks; I think Doc Av is confusing this caliber with the 12.7x81SR.

Japanese Army 13.2x99 for Army Aircraft Cannon

I think you meant to put “Navy” there, Doc. The 13.2 x 99 Hotchkiss MG was adopted by the Imperial Japanese Navy as its light AA gun (under the designation 13 mm Type 93), and the ammunition was also used in a modified Browning gun for naval aircraft, the 13 mm Type 3.

The Japanese Army did adopt the 13.2 mm Hotchkiss as the Type 92 Tank Machine Gun, but I’m not sure how many were still in use in WW2.

Naval 13.2 Ammo was headstamped in the normal IJN manner as was imported French and Italian ammo up to 1940.
The three-mount and two mount Naval gun, adapted to a ground mount, was also used by Army, examples seen in New Guinea to protect Japanese airfields.

Doc AV

Yes, the Japanese made all kinds of makeshift arrangements under the pressure of combat, with the Army also using naval 25 mm AA mountings including the triple mounts.