Help identifying an early centerfire casing


#1

Ive recently been doing a major restoration of my house, which included raising it about 6 feet off the ground. while cleaning out some things from underneath it, I came across this very unusual (to me at least) centerfire cartridge laying in an area that about 75 years ago was the front yard.
unfortunately, even though it hasn’t ever been fired, its missing the projectile, and a small piece of the casing.
Aside from just its odd appearance, I also noticed that it appears to be made out of a piece of cast copper or bronze that was drilled out, rather than the thin brass casing that I’m accustomed to.
I’ve done several searches on the internet and I cant find anything about it at all, so, here I am.
From what I can see, the headstamp reads:
WISE

1718-70

Here’s a couple pictures of it, with a 7.62x25 tokarev and a 32 auto for comparison

Any information about it would be appreciated.
Thanks.


#2

Im no expert on these but it looks like an ignitor for a large gun(artillary). And it probably isnt as old as you think it is.
There are a number of very knowledgeable people on this forum who will chime in and give you all the information you require and more.


#3

[quote=“craigt”]Im no expert on these but it looks like an ignitor for a large gun(artillary). And it probably isnt as old as you think it is.
There are a number of very knowledgeable people on this forum who will chime in and give you all the information you require and more.[/quote]

Ah, i hadnt thought of that, but that would explain the really robust primer cap and lack of a bullet… i still have a feeling its somewhat old, just because of where i found it, but i could be wrong…


#4

I seem to recall WISE was a cartridge manufacturer early during WWI. That casing, an artillery ignitor, looks a lot newer than WWI.


#5

Looks like a percussion primer. The USN version is the MK 2. Not sure what the Army nomenclature might be.

Age is a relative thing. “Old” to you may mean something completely different to me. Composition of the soil makes all the difference in the amount of corrosion. I have found artifacts in New Mexico from the Cortez and Coronado eras that were in relatively good condition, while a similar item found in say, San Diego, may be nothing but a crusty blob.

Ray


#6

Here is a link to a pic of a primer similar to the topic item:

fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land … sld014.htm

Dave


#7

J. B. Wise Inc., of Watertown, Conn. was a cartridge maker, and plumber. at the outbreak of WW I he looked for contracts & in 1915 he opened a plant and made the 7 mm Mauser for the Maxim Gun, and Maxim later acquired the plant. Wise also made the .30 W.C.F. (only one .30-30 is known) & he also made the canon primers.
I have the following lots all have the prefix of: 1718. So; 1718-1, -11, -21, -23, -27, -67, -81, -86, and -100
He passed in 1916,while on vacation in Atlantic City and on Dec. 24th 1918 there was an explosion at his plant killing two brothers.


#8

Interesting. The “-70” on the headstamp had me thinking 1970.