Help on .303


#1

Hi all,
Here is a new post about my .303
I already posted the 1st one and Tony told me it coulb be a French made with US case.
I recentlty found the second one wich has one hole ant the cap is not crimped. Same origin?
No idea about third and fourth!
What kind of bullet on the right hand Spanish?

Regards
Philippe


#2

Good Morning Philippe,

No 1 & 2 definitley US cases look like dummy rounds to me especially No 2 with the drilled holes

No 3 could be some kind of armourers gauge

No. 4 - It looks like a Mk7 nitrocellulose loaded round made in 1994 and the only reference I can find to “OK” code is Indian Ordnance factory, Khamaria, Jubbulpore but I have them down as only making .303 from 1943 until the 1970’s so that’s an odd one I am sure someone might be able to give us more info on it.

No. 5 just a guess but I have some AP rounds with similar bullet nose

Rich


#3

Morning Rich,
I don’t think the last is AP as it is a non magnetic one.
Philippe


#4

I agree about No.1 and 2, but whether they are genuine French drill rounds or not I cannot say.
No.3 is a check gauge for setting machinery on the production line. This looks like it is for checking loaded round weight as it is 378 grains.
No.4 is Ordnance Factory, Khamaria, Jubbulpore as Rich says. It is a late date from that factory. I had it down as making .303 until the 1970s on my website as they were certainly making 7.62mm by 1978. However, i have now amended my website.

I can’t help with No.5, but I suspect it may be a sporting round loaded on a military case.

Regards
TonyE


#5

Hi Philippe, No. 5 is an Spanish hunting cartridge made at Sevilla and is loaded with a Rada copper point bullet (covered hollow point).


#6

Thanks all,
What about the country of the third one?
Philippe


#7

The #3, sorry I can’t help with the ‘who made it’.

However mine is stamped “R B” over “399 GRNS”. & laid out at 12, 9 & 4 o’clock with the R B letters bottom at the ‘primer’ & not as shown here, towards the rim.
It also has a GMCS bullet jacket & the bullet seems to go to just below the neck


#8

#5 looks to have a Remington Bronze Point hunting bullet loaded into a military case.
This was very common in the later 1940’s and 1950’s.
Gregg


#9

Sorry, I should have said that No.3 was British. It is so easy to assume that others recognise what is clear to oneself!

Given the “RB” stamp, it was probably made at ROF Birtley.

Regards
TonyE


#10

Thanks all; still have to classify many dummies and English 303.
Philippe


#11

Tony would the “RB” have ever been used as part of a headstamp on any service ammunition because I can not find any reference to “RB” anywhere not even in your book :-)

Rich.


#12

Gregg - while the projectile in that Spanish cartridge bears some resemblence to the Remington Bronze Point, it is not just a Remington bullet loaded into a Spanish case. Fede has the correct answer about its identity, posted before your entry.


#13

Gregg, these sporting cartridges were made by Pirotecnia de Sevilla in six different calibers: 7x57 (Rada 7,30), 7x57R (Rada 7,30), .303 British (Rada 7,90), 8x57R (Rada 8,03), 8x57S (Rada 8,20) and 8x57RS (Rada 8,20). These were ordered and named in behalf of Ricardo de Rada y del Peral, a notorious military that in this timeframe was Captain-General of the Second Military Region, General Captaincy of Sevilla (1946-52), and later director of the Army Museum (1952-54). He died on June 7, 1956, but known headstamps indicate that production of these cartridges continued at least until 1963.


#14

Is cartridge 5 then not one of Rada’s rimmed 8 m/m cartridges? Is it in effect a wildcat comprising a .303 case necked up to 7.9 m/m, or is it a true 8 x 57R? Jack


#15

Jack, in spite of the unusual designations of the Rada bullets these cartridges have standard dimensions.


#16

[quote=“RichT”]Tony would the “RB” have ever been used as part of a headstamp on any service ammunition because I can not find any reference to “RB” anywhere not even in your book :-)

Rich.[/quote]

No, “RB” was never used as a headstamp code, but “ROFB” for “Royal Ordnance Factory Birtlley” is found on British 9mm Inspection rounds and “RLB” for “Royal Laboratory” Birtley is a common code used on artillery ammunition.

It was purely a suspicion that “RB” might be Birtley.

Regards
TonyE