Help wanted: BPD 12 Ga. tracer shotshell


#1

Any help with this shotshell? Brass one-piece case, BPD manufacture.
Would need clues about year of manufacture… and about the use of a tracer shotshell load.




#2

After WWII

the use ? like for any tracer, to make corrections about the shooting

not only BPD made tracers, but also Eley, winchester, aso
jp


#3

[quote=“jean-pierre”]After WWII

the use ? like for any tracer, to make corrections about the shooting

not only BPD made tracers, but also Eley, winchester, aso
jp[/quote]

Thank you for the info, but… where was the tracer lodged, in the wad? How long the wad flies along with the pellets?


#4

I had the same shotshells with the box.
Box was date Nov 1943.

451kr,


#5

[quote=“451kr”]I had the same shotshells with the box.
Box was date Nov 1943.

451kr,[/quote]

As early as 1943?
Rome was liberated in June 1944.
This means BPD was manufacturing shotshells under German occupation.
Interesting.

Have you a picture of the box ?

jp


#6

I can’t say where the BPD tracer element was located but shotgun tracers usually have a cup or plug behind the shot column. The difficulty is, of course, keeping the tracer near the center of the shot pattern otherwise it’s not of much use. Many shooters think shot tracers are a waste of money and create bad shooting habits.

Wads generally do not travel far from the muzzle and are inclined to take off in odd directions so a tracer behind or in the wads would be useless. Mixing a tracer compound with the shot has also been tried.

Ray


#7

JP,

Unfortunately I sold the box on the last Dutch ammo show,
but I know for sure that the box was date 1943.

451kr.


#8

ok thanks
jp


#9

Shotgun tracers were a bit of a fad rather than the useful training aid that they were marketed as.
In Britain they were available from Eley throughout my boyhood but I never could afford to buy any.

The tracer pellet was ignited by a hole through the centre of the wad. However, the pellet is a different size and shape compared to a piece of shot and has a vastly different ballistic co-effient.

The effect of this means that the pellet flies at a different trajectory to the main body of the shot and the separation becomes more apparant as the pellet burns.

They certainly made it into the plastic wad era. A company called Kent Cartridges in Britain were offering them as recently as ten or so years ago


#10

[quote=“Vince Green”]Shotgun tracers were a bit of a fad rather than the useful training aid that they were marketed as.
In Britain they were available from Eley throughout my boyhood but I never could afford to buy any.

The tracer pellet was ignited by a hole through the centre of the wad. However, the pellet is a different size and shape compared to a piece of shot and has a vastly different ballistic co-effient.

The effect of this means that the pellet flies at a different trajectory to the main body of the shot and the separation becomes more apparant as the pellet burns.
[/quote]

That’s what I thought. Thank you.