Help with ID of links

Please see attached photo of a small group of links I stumbled across. Can anyone help ID them?

Numbers added for conversation clarity as requested.

Thanks!

How about having them in one row or something that can be addressed by left to right and row 1, 2, 3 etc.?
Answering on pics with no order is a pain to be honest and can confuse others.

Numbers added as requested. Thanks!

I’d say #4 is for the 15x120mm XM157 spotting round.

Paul

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I believe #2 are 20mm Vulcan links with the primer cover.

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#1
12.7x99 T175 tank MG, USA

#2
20x102 MK5 (likely Mod0 or series) Phalanx loading links, USA

#3
20x128 KAA Oerlikon, Switzerland

#5
20x110 HS m/45, Sweden

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RF Insensitive M52A3B1 Electric Primers 1992 US, MK 7 Radiation Hazard (RADHAZ) Belt Link, 20 x 102mm PHALANX.pdf (1.8 MB)

3 Likes

Awesome guys, thanks!

Brian, thank you for the report!

dak21, any chance to get better images of the Swedish m/45 link with the starter tab?
Like straight from top and bottom and if you feel like from some other perspectives.

How about this?

dak21, NICE! Great link!

Thanks a lot!

Alex, number 2 are Mark 7 links and under certain circumstances are a requirement of the M50 ammunition series because of their susceptible HERO class. Also, they predate the introduction of the Phalanx system.

Regarding number 3, why do you identify it as Swiss?

Regards,

Fede

Fede, thanks for the clarification on the MK7.
Were these used for direct gun feedin or only as a loading link?

The 20x128:
The identical one I had came withe the remark “Swiss”.
Hearing your question now makes me think it could be incorrect?

It is used for loading only if the area if RADHAZ unsafe; otherwise, they are not needed.

I’m not sure about the KAA links because there was a US manufacturer (Barry L. Miller) that used this marking in their links. I don’t know if they manufactured this model, but seems too much of a coincidence.

Indeed, I have an entry for “BLM” being:
Barry L. Filler Engineering Inc., Hawthorne, CA (in 1970s)

Alex, you’re most welcome for the extra pictures. Let me know if you need to see anything else.

Thanks to everyone who has responded for the rather fascinating conversation and humbling learning opportunity.