Hick's Percussion Caps

Anyone here know anything about HICK’s Percussion Caps?
I just reviewed a large accumulation of cartridges yesterday, and part of the accumulation was a box full of old percussion cap and primer tins.
I knew who they all were except for the ones marked HICK’s.
Gregg

Hick’s was not a manufactures name. It was rather a trade name. (example AA shotshells were not made by AA, but a trade name used by Olin Corp.) American Flask & Cap Co. of Waterbury used this name and later Waterbury Manufacturing Co. I seem to recall other company also making Hick’s percussion caps.

Later on UMC and then Remington-UMC made use of the Hicks name on their percussion caps well into the 20th century. Jack

Hi Gregg.

Walter Hicks established a cap manufactury at 55 Cliff St., New York City in 1854 untile 1856. He moved to 52 Beekman St. Haverstraw, N.Y in 1857.
In 1857, Walter Hicks and Frank Frary jointly formed the American Flask and Cap Company in Waterbury, Ct.
In the late 1860’s, The Waterbury Brass Co. became the owners. They kept the AmF&C Co name until 1869-70. American Brass Company eventually took them over (I am not sure of the date). Finally, American Brass Co was swallowed up by Anaconda.
The cap manufacturing portion of the business was sold off to Remington/Winchester circa 1898. They kept using the Hicks name for another decade or two.

(please note that this information came from research by Jim Gooding and Bob Cheel).

Hope this helps.

Cheers,
Will.

Thanks for the info.
The only info I could find on line indicated Hick’s was all pre Civil War stuff, and I could not believe the tins were that old.
Late 1800’s or pre WWI looked more like it to me.
Greghg

A 250 HICKS PRIMERS No 2 just poped up on Ebay too:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Percussion-Caps-Brass-Tin-Union-Metallic-Cartridge-Co-/300511989914?pt=Vintage_Hunting&hash=item45f7e9109a#ht_720wt_1139

U.M.C. first listed “Hicks” Percussion Caps in their 1901 catalog. They may have started in 1900, but I don’t have that catalog. However they are not listed in the 1899 catalog. The 1901 catalog lists 3 type of “Hicks” caps.

HICK’S BRAND “F.L.” TRIMMED EDGE, FOIL-LINED, WATERPROOF, CENTRAL-FIRE
Available in sizes 9-13+18.

HICK’S BRAND “E.B.” GROUND EDGE, FOIL-LINED, WATERPROOF, CENTRAL-FIRE
Available in sizes 9-14+18.

“HICKS” MUSKET CAPS

“F.L.” stands for “Foil Lined” I’m not sure what “E.B.” means.

After the U.M.C-Remington merger in 1911, Remington continued to list “Hicks” Percussion & Musket Caps until at least 1923. That is the last catalog that I have that lists them. My next catalog is 1929 and they are no longer listed.

Hi Will,
Any more info on Waterbury Brass Co.

Thanks, Terry

Hi Terry.
Nothing new on Waterbury Brass. Sorry.

Cheers,
Will.

Terry,

Attached pic of a Hicks poster, date unknown to me.

Jim Buchanan

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Thank you Jim

Jim, I don’t know the date of the original ad but this reproduction was made in 1992 by Desperate Sign Co., Ohio.

Regards,

Fede

Fede,

Thanks.

I have wondered about this one - could it be a made up 1992 fictional repro and not a copy of a real Hicks add . ???

Why I say that is - see the attached pic from one of my original British posters - note the similarity of central pic of the three shooters .

Sporting Ballistite was made by Nobels from circa 1895.

Jim

block1.gif

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Jim, I think you are right. This company made reproductions but also lots of fantasy ads. Below you can see a well known example.

Great poster, by the way.

Regards,

Fede

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Since I like Bears, I like the fantasy poster better than the Winchester (?) poster it was a take-off on. :-) Score one for the bears!

John

Isn’t this a tongue in cheek take off on the Remington ad “The right of way” where the gent with a model 8 faced an annoyed grizzly? As satire it isn’t bad, but the reference would be mostly lost to a modern sporting audience. Jack

Isn’t it even older? I remember: “In a tight place, shoot UMC cartridges.”

Jack - that’s why I put the question mark. I think both you and Peelen are correct, that it was a take off on that Remington ad which, in turn, was a updated form of the original UMC, done after the merger.

John