Highlighting Headstamp Markings

May I ask which item is used to make the mark with white?

Try simply white toothpaste. It´s easy removable.

I use white pen correction fluid, let dry, and remove the excess with a alcohol soaked cotton. Works fine in headstamps and firearms markings.

It’s the same as my original idea, but I was not sure before. Thank you very much for your advice
best
Wendy

With white chalk, were children play with on the streets.

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I’ve used china marker/white grease pencil and plain old talcum powder.

White pen correction fluid used in my 5,45 x 39 collection.

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We have used chalk, and grease pencils, for 50+ years, with chalk being the easier and preferred method to bring out markings. Rub the chalk in/on, wipe off everything dusty on the surface, done.

Personally, I have had bad luck with correction fluid, bad hands make for sloppy work with liquids on small things.

I think if you want to keep it for the long term use correction fluid, if it’s just temporary use chalk

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For me, it depends on why I’m filling the headstamp and that’s almost always to make an image for publication, either in a book, article, Forum post, etc. I’ve tried all the liquids over the years and have made a lot of messes, often with poor results, especially when the headstamp has small, fine characters. I also tried toothpaste and after rubbing it on the headstamp discovered that it is an abrasive and will polish brass easily.

I use the pencil tool in Photoshop, and can get a solid white (or any other color) line as small as one pixel. The examples below are about 3-5 pixels as I recall. The neat thing is when I screw one up, I just hit Ctrl+z and the segment I was drawing is erased. Obviously, this doesn’t leave any marks on the actual cartridge.

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BIC whie-0ut makes a water soluble product spread on being careful not to get into the primer pocket, let it set for a second & wipe off any excess. It can easily be removed with a wooden toothpick in any areas where it shouldn’t be other than the primer pocket, It you wan it all gone a little water & a rag or toothbrush

Mel,
How do you get the curves so precise in photoshop?

First impression is very good!!!

John; The curves are actually very short segments of straight lines. With the headstamp enlarged greatly on your screen, position the pencil tool over one point at the end of a straight or curved line. Then move the tool to a position a bit away from the first while holding down in shift button, click, and the line fills in, then repeat all the way around a curve. When seen at a normal scale, the line appears curved, but it’s really a series of short, sometimes very short, straight lines. You can free-hand draw a curved line, but I generally screw that up. It takes some time at first, but after a while, it goes pretty quickly.

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Thanks Mel,
I’ve used freehand with the brush tool and the results were pretty unattractive. I’ll have a try with your advice and hope I can get it as good as yours!!! Have hundreds to do, so will get more enthusiastic if I can get it right.
Cheers
John

That’s a good idea, if it’s not unmanageable. I think it’s also clear and nice to coat them all with correction fluid
best regards
Wendy

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That is a good solution if you have a steady hand, but for those of us who do not, using the mouse or a track ball on something that fine is difficult. I tried that with my trackball mouse on my primary computer, and, no, dismal failure on my part. That is the reason I stick with chalk, (which works great on firearm markings that are inevitably stamped into a curved surface).

I also have Photoshop on my laptop, which has a touchscreen, and using a small enough stylus might do the trick your way.

Jack, the clou might be that one has to zoom into the letters (full screen with one letter). And as said use the straight line mode wher ethe line is drawn only after the mouse button is released again.
It does not work with the “free hand mode”.

That is why I was thinking of a stylus on a touch screen, it would be like drawing it with a pen/pencil, and very precise.

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Mel,

Changed the tool to a brush. Much easier since the cursor is a circle, same size as the brush. My old 79 year old eyes have trouble particularly on old corroded headstamps. Since I don’t have a collection I depend upon photos, a lot of which are less than perfect. Mostly my own fault through lack of ability even with a good camera.
Also found that varying the percentage of opacity can make them look a little more natural.
Again, thanks for your help it is much appreciated.
Cheers
John

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