History of the Aerial Gatling Gun, U.S. Airforce


#1

I did a search for this here on the Forum and could not find it listed so hopefully this is not a repeat. The report is listed here as a source of background information for the types of cartridges tested/used in multi barrel gatling gun systems by the U.S.

THE HISTORY OF THE AERIAL GATLING GUN, REPORT NUMBER 87-0415, MAJOR DENNIS C. CAREL, AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE, AIR UNIVERSITY, MAXWELL AFB, AL; 1987.

http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA179871

This is a brief history concerning the development of aircraft mounted multi-barrel gatling guns. Calibers include 7.62 mm, .60 Cal., 20 mm, 27 mm (mentioned on p. 11) & 30 mm.

Brian


#2

Thanks Brian
Does anyone know if this 27mm T-150 is/was the same as the Winchester 27mm?


#3

Interesting report, thanks for posting. Obviously from the “pilot” perspective, as it mentions all of the aircraft associated with the gun, but never mentions a specific round or link.


#4

Which was the Winchester one?

The T150 mostly used the straight-cased 27x70B, although they also tried a 27x96B (same COAL) which is much rarer.


#5

This Winchester,

This 20x96B you mention, it was also a Winchester?


#6

There was also a 38mm, five barrel weapon. It was the T132E2 Rocket Launcher. It was Ordnance Project TU2-1033 at the Ordnance Research Foundation. It was a rocket projectile on a lightweight gun. I have a dummy round, a foot of the barrels from the muzzle and the film of some of the firing tests which look to me like the rounds had a random point of impact.

This is probably the least documented of the Aerial Gatlings. Eglin AFB was involved in the testing. Too bad Maj Carel missed it in his research.

Cheers,
Lew

PS: If anyone has more info on this weapon or ammo, please let me know.


#7

Yes, that’s the one I meant, although my example and the others I’ve seen have brass cases.

I’ve never heard them called ‘Winchester’ before.


#8

Perhaps 20x96B should be 27x96B?

The following is a quote from the thread 27 mm Experimental http://www.bocn.co.uk/vbforum/threads/93858-27-mm-Experimental, post by “EODGUY”:

“As far as I know the 27x70Bmm rounds were developed by Olin Mathieson, East Alton, Illinois. Several variations were made (HEI (T144), Target Practice (T142), Dummy (T143) and High Pressure Test), but in relatively small quantities. One pilot lot of about 50,000 rounds of the HEI were made for testing. I do not know when the contract began, but it was supposedly sponsored by the Army Ordnance Corps and terminated in 1955. Even though the Ordnance Corps sponsored it, I have always heard it was for an airborne gun system. The projectile length for the HEI was 113mm and it weighed 250 grams with the fuze. Velocity was given as 615 m/s (2,000fps). I have never seen a photo, or a round, of the actual fuzed HEI cartridge. The electric primed cases for the rounds were made in both brass and aluminum. There was also a long cased version with a shorter projectile. This round was the same overall length as the 70mm case lengthed round. It had a 96mm long case. A velocity of 860m/s (2,700-2,800 fps) and a projectile that weighed 200 g with fuze. I have never seen an example of the long cased version.”

And from PetedeCoux’s photo, posted above, concerning Pete’s use of the descriptive term “Winchester” for the 27x70mmB cartridge:

From MIL-STD-1461E 1990 AMMUNITION MANUFACTURERS AND THEIR SYMBOLS:

Brian


#9

Yes it should - a typo, sorry. I’ve corrected my post.

OK thanks, I’ve just never heard it described as the 27mm Winchester before.
Curiously, Dale Davis’s book on auto cannon ammo 20-30mm doesn’t mention it at all.