Hoffman short range bullet


#1




Can anyone give me more information on this bullet? It came to me in a package marked Hoffman Short Range.
In packet was one bullet and one loaded cartridge.
Aluminum bullet with 2 o rings weighs 58 gr.
Case with bullet weighs 142 gr.
Thanks,
Bob Ruebel


#2

Hi Bob,

These aluminum projectiles were part of an indoor practice kit made by Hoffman Products of Lake Forest, Illinois. The complete kit included six projectiles for “.38 Special” or “.45 Caliber Handgun”, a bullet trap and a handy little reloading press. The manufacturer also recommended to load the cases using Winchester-Western 630 ball powder.

The earliest reference I have listing this product is dated 1979 and the company making it was later named Hoffman New Ideas, Inc.


Water Seal Round?
#3

Bob, I have a 9mm/38 version of this bullet in a W-W case and it is labeled Hoffman New Ideas Inc., 821 E. Northmoor Rd, Lake Forest Ill, I obtained it no later than the very early 80s. The note that came to me with it was that Hoffman only made the bullet and was loaded by the shooter. I only obtained the bullet in a primed, unloaded case. I must have gotten it from someone who had the packet, but I have neither the packet nor a copy of the packet so have no way of knowing whether it was ever intended for use in a 9mm pistol. It would never function the pistol and my guess, based on it’s construction, is that it was intended to be a reusable bullet.

Cheers,

Lew


#4

Lew, I checked my files and noted that “Hoffman Products” was an alternate name used by this company but the original one was “Hoffmann New Ideas, Inc.”, although most sources list its name as “Hoffman New Ideas, Inc.”. It was established by Anton R. Hoffmann in August 19, 1979.

Here you can see some details of the projectile and loading press construction (from patent filled December 12, 1977). Fig. 5 shows the projectile loaded in a special short case described as a “special primer holder”. Number 40 shows the powder receiving hole which according to the manufacturer creates a “rocket-like effect”. I don’t think this was designed for automatic pistols of any caliber.


#5

Fede
Do you have a patent number for this press? I tried sharing your drawing with our friends at Antique Reloading Tools, to see if any were made or survived but they want more info.
Thank you
Gerry


#6

Hi Gerry, here you can download the full patent (click the light blue rectangle where it says “Click here to start download from sendspace”):

sendspace.com/file/qrb00s

Cheers,

Fede


#7

Just another “the world isn’t ready for this” invention. I saw one of these sets, or at least something very similar, at a gun show maybe 15 years ago, possibly longer than that. I wonder if the O-ring seals (if that’s what they are) would last for more than a few shots. Rocket-like effect? That line may have helped sell what few sets were sold. Would be interesting to read the original instruction sheet. Does anybody have one?


#8

Thank you Fede
The first try they wanted me to download their tool bar, the second try I went directly to file. Some day it may be worth alot due to it’s rarity.