How do you pronounce cetme


#1

Picked this question off another guns and shooting Forum that I visit. Interesting enough that I thought I’d post it here.

What say you??

Ray


#2

“set-me” don’t know if thats correct though.


#3

Ditto. Is there another way?


#4

“chet - me” with “me” pronounced like in the word “mess”


#5

it is Set-me with “me” pronounced like in the word “mess” in French
jp


#6

Well, the pronounciation depends where you live and what language you speak. I work for a Spanish (Espana) company and we have several Spaniards working here. So I went to them for an answer. CETME’s first letter is pronounced like if you said “zebra” in Spanish, a sound similar to “Th” in “Theodore”. And the end, like Pivi said, just like “mess”.


#7

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Picked this question off another guns and shooting Forum that I visit. Interesting enough that I thought I’d post it here.

What say you??

Ray[/quote]

The correct one is ZETME, my own version is “Freaky HK G3”, I think Herr Volgrimmler (the designer) should be satisfied that the spaniards finally adopts the HK G36,LOL !!!.


#8

Well thanks, Ray! This sure is disappointing. I thought I had the pronunciation on this pretty much figured out, and was real comfortable with ‘set-me’; now I find I haven’t a clue how to pronounce it, nor would I be able to remember any of the assorted alternative suggestions. Pardon me if I stick with ‘set-me’.


#9

You’re welcome guy. ;) I do what I can to educate you guys. I wish my dad was still alive. He was Czech/Polak/Slav and it would have been interesting to hear him pronounce it.

Ray


#10

[quote=“DGFM”]
The correct one is ZETME, my own version is “Freaky HK G3”, I think Herr Volgrimmler (the designer) should be satisfied that the spaniards finally adopts the HK G36,LOL !!!.[/quote]

Well, I am not so sure about what Mr. Vorgrimmler’s feelings would be. The G36, being a gas operated, rotatory head bolt, has nothing to do with the Cetme or the G3. And Heckler and Koch is now a British company…


#11

“Chat Me” is relatively close.

Ludwig Vorgrimler was a wonderfully sarcastic figure. I’ve read a number of his reports on Mauser projects (he rejoined Mauser’s R&D departement in the 1960s) and they did make me laugh quite a bit. So I guess he would have appreciated the irony.


#12

Not that I know anything about this but I always pronounced it as if the “C” was hard. Like a “K”. Ket-me. Like Ketchup. Shows you what I know. :-)
Zac


#13

Coincidentally this recently bothered me too (I was rather startled to be told a while back on this forum that Carcano is pronounced Karkano - not what I had expected!) so I asked a Spanish cartridge collector I know and he said it’s a soft C as in “se”.

But we now seem to have various possibilities at both ends:

Se…, Ze… or Ch… at the front end, and …mee or …may at the back.

The “et” in the middle seems fairly clear though :-)


#14

Since cetme is actually an acronym and not a word, perhaps everyone is correct and no one is incorrect. Breaking it down to the individual letters will result in different pronunciations, depending upon the language. Going back to my old man, I remember that “c” was pronounced as “ch” and “e” was pronounced as “i” or “ih”. My name is actually Mikita, a result of the well known “Ellis Island” syndrome.

Interesting thread though, won’t you agree?

Ray


#15

All I know is that I’m a Luddite, and that I pronounce it “Cee-Eee-Tee-Mm-Eee”


#16

CETME: Centro de Estudios Tecnicos de Materiales Especiales (or the Centre for the Technical Study of Special Materials)

“Centro” in Spanish is pronounced “Sentro” ( Sen-tro, with a short “o”; so the correct (Spanish) pronunciation is “Set-me” ( short “e”; and so on.

Do not confuse with Italian, where “Centro” is pronounced “Chentro”…and the other words are also different.

It all depends of how the ancient Latin “C” is treated when followed by certain Vowels: in Spanish, C followed by E & I, is sibillant ( “s” sound) ; followed by A, O, U, it is Hard (“K-G”"sound, as in Latin);
In Italian it is different, where the “C” when followed by an A or an O or a U, it is Hard (K sound) but when followed by an E or an I, it is a “CH” sound.

In English, true to form, there is another rule; C before A or O or U is Hard, before E or I it is Sibilant ( also before AE, as in Caesar ( “Seezar” as pronounced in English…pronounced in Latin, it is “Kesar” ( as in German (almost,) “Kaiser”)…in Italian it is Cesare (Chesare).

And just to top it all of, in French, NATO is pronounced “OTAN”

LOL,
Doc AV
AVBallistics.


#17

Thanks Doc, that’s a useful summary!


#18

[quote=“DocAV”]
And just to top it all of, in French, NATO is pronounced "OTAN"
Doc AV
AVBallistics.[/quote]

Don’t say that. Some people will believe it !
jp